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Dental problems

dentabox

Unverified
Joined
Sep 1, 2017
Messages
11
#21
Sadly I am sure that you are correct. But if it affects the ability of people to do their task(s). It must be very disruptive as a dental emergency is unexpected so few options are available. There are also reports of medical evacuation for dental emergencies!
 

Andoni

Cryptologic Support
Verified Military
Joined
Jun 3, 2017
Messages
108
Location
CONUS
#22
Did a dental problem / emergency affect your role or task?
No. Never. Once, I was able to put a tooth that got knocked out, in my pocket, but then I forgot about it and 18 hours later, nobody, including myself, cared about my salvaged molar in my pocket. I'm having general surgery for dental today, though. They're taking out 8 teeth, removing embedded fragments and grafting bone.
 

TLDR20

SF Medical Sergeant
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#23
I mean we do things in the military to prevent emergencies to the best of our ability. Number one is removing wisdom teeth. Number two is the predeployment dental visit. Number three are the yearly dental visits required. Emergencies may happen, but that is more likely because a tooth got knocked out or severely damaged.
 

Ooh-Rah

Marine
Moderator
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
7,261
#24
Number one is removing wisdom teeth.
I literally do not know one Marine who got out of the Corps with their wisdom-teeth intact. Long believed it to be a conspiracy for Navy docs to get their practice.

At least mine were able to wait until I got to the fleet, those poor bastards who had to get it done during boot camp....
 

CDG

Mittens
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Off safe. One away.
#25
I literally do not know one Marine who got out of the Corps with their wisdom-teeth intact. Long believed it to be a conspiracy for Navy docs to get their practice.

At least mine were able to wait until I got to the fleet, those poor bastards who had to get it done during boot camp....
Mine weren't even coming in, and they removed them in Navy basic. Cut my gums open, used an impact drill to break the teeth apart, then pulled the fragments. I got the joy of being awake the whole time as well. Obviously numbed up with lidocaine, but still. Nothing like hearing your own teeth crack while some sadist is pushing down on a drill that's jammed into your gums.
 

AWP

Formerly Known as Freefalling
Administrator
Joined
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Messages
13,472
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Not Afghanistan
#26
Cut my gums open, used an impact drill to break the teeth apart, then pulled the fragments. I got the joy of being awake the whole time as well. Obviously numbed up with lidocaine, but still. Nothing like hearing your own teeth crack while some sadist is pushing down on a drill that's jammed into your gums.
My experience was similar, but I was a civilian. The sounds were...odd to say the least. The surgeon gave me some awesome pain pills, I went home, plugged the Crow soundtrack into my CD player, and watched a ceiling fan for an hour.
 

dentabox

Unverified
Joined
Sep 1, 2017
Messages
11
#27
Wisdom teeth are often removed as a preventative measure in this type of situation. I'm referring to front teeth damaged due to trauma.
 

TLDR20

SF Medical Sergeant
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#28
Wisdom teeth are often removed as a preventative measure in this type of situation. I'm referring to front teeth damaged due to trauma.
I don’t really get what your point is here. If it is traumatic the SM would be evac’ed. There are oral surgeons and dentists in theater.
 

dentabox

Unverified
Joined
Sep 1, 2017
Messages
11
#29
If the problem cannot be handled by the medic on site then evacuation is the only option. Not all dental emergencies require evacuation which is not only costly but also disruptive. The range of options which can be managed on site is relevant. Using pain-killers works up to a point due to side-affects, sharp edges irritating the tongue, etc.
 

TLDR20

SF Medical Sergeant
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#30
If the problem cannot be handled by the medic on site then evacuation is the only option. Not all dental emergencies require evacuation which is not only costly but also disruptive. The range of options which can be managed on site is relevant. Using pain-killers works up to a point due to side-affects, sharp edges irritating the tongue, etc.
Do you want to discuss those options?

I understand the capabilities of many of our medics, particularly SOF medics. We can do plenty to manage symptoms, and do a temporary fix. Next step is evac. Period.

The types of things that cause severe enough dental injuries tht a SOF medic cannot handle it is often due to trauma that is itself needing of evac. My team sergeant had a “dental emergency” in that he had his jaw and teeth destroyed in an IED blast. The teeth are literally the least important thing unless it compromises the airway.

We can do plenty of things that reduce pain and discomfort, most realistically, some Novocain and tooth extraction or a temporary filler are what is happening.
 

TLDR20

SF Medical Sergeant
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#31
Also you know what is more distracting than a 45 minute evac and a dentist appointment at Bagram? An 18D fucking something up because he got an 8 hour day of dentistry and thinks he knows what’s up....
 

Devildoc

Verified Military
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
1,923
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Durham, NC
#32
I literally do not know one Marine who got out of the Corps with their wisdom-teeth intact. Long believed it to be a conspiracy for Navy docs to get their practice.

At least mine were able to wait until I got to the fleet, those poor bastards who had to get it done during boot camp....
I kept my wisdom teeth until I was 40 years old. The Navy wanted take them out, made me a Class 2 Dental, but they wouldn't force me to get them out because I didn't have any problems. I have perfect teeth. No cavities, no orthodontics, no drama, no nothing. I told them if they wanted to take out my wisdom teeth I was going to do it on my own terms with sedation. And when I turned 40, that's exactly what I did.
 

Topkick

Verified Military
Joined
Apr 26, 2017
Messages
511
#33
Also you know what is more distracting than a 45 minute evac and a dentist appointment at Bagram? An 18D fucking something up because he got an 8 hour day of dentistry and thinks he knows what’s up....
When you are in pain with dental problems, it could be comforting to know you have an 18D nearby. Better than fuckin nothing!
 

policemedic

Verified SWAT
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A galaxy far, far away
#34
One, I agree with @TLDR20. Facial trauma that causes dental issues is going to result in evac, and teeth that that aren’t in the airway aren’t on my radar.

I learned to wire jaws from a dentist and a senior and junior 18D who were kind enough to watch me practice. There are options available for minor problems but I do not consider myself a dentist and will happily transfer care.
 

Ranger Psych

Ranger
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Sep 6, 2008
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#35
Pre-dep involves confirming dental stuff is good to go.
During deployment, if you're at a FOB you'll roll through sick call like normal and then go to dental if on a big enough place to have it, else guess what.. you get to ride to where dental can work it is if it's an issue that truly needs work.

Or, if you're in my case and have a wisdom tooth that's ok pre-deployment, then decides to maneuver it's way to chewing a hole sideways out of your cheek, you get lucky because you're doing some hearts-and-minds medcap missions.....

With dental coming in to fix hadj grills.

That gets a delayed departure bird due to primary (read, killing bad guys) mission requirements vs random transports of random assholes...

That then decide since they still have supplies, and are bored, "let's do dental sick call"

Annnd RP is jumping up and down ME ME ME ME UNFUCK MAH MOUF PLZTHX!!!1!

"Yep, fucked up. Does this hurt?"
Nope
*cranks some more on wisdom tooth* Still doesn't hurt?
Nope. If you're going to pull it, can you use my leatherman?
"uhh, you sure? It'll work, but..."
Fuck yeah, let's do this

*POINK*

Packing wad of some nasty tasting gauze later and some motrin with "hit up your medic if it starts hurting worse".... it never hurt in the first place post-removal. Good to go.
 

Fl_Ag

AF Space Ops
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Messages
16
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Colorado
#36
My experience was similar, but I was a civilian. The sounds were...odd to say the least. The surgeon gave me some awesome pain pills, I went home, plugged the Crow soundtrack into my CD player, and watched a ceiling fan for an hour.
Same here. About three days after my 19th birthday during my freshman year of college (and about a week before Christmas). I was expecting full sedation because that's what all my buddies had experienced when getting their wisdom teeth pulled. Lo and behold, I show up and there's a mean-looking syringe like something out of Close Encounters of the Third Kind which provided the local anesthetic before the slicing, drilling, and crunching that I went on to listen to for a solid hour or two.