Rucking for A&S

Stanimal

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Guys, please....do not duct tape your feet. Listen to Uncle Petey and Hitman2/3 on this one. Do these things and you will be golden:
1. Get a pair of thin, polypropylene socks to wear next to the skin. Under Armor makes quality socks, but there are many manufacturers out there. These thin socks wick moisture away from the skin.
2. Get a pair of smartwool trekking socks to wear over the poly socks. These are nice and thick and will glide over the poly socks, reducing heat and friction while protecting the skin. If they're too bulky for your liking, at least go with smartwool hiking, which are a little bit thinner.
3. Bring both pairs of these socks with you when you go to try on boots. That way you'll be able to get the proper size. Boots should be USMC issued style, fairly light weight but sturdy, fit good in the ankle/heel cup, be wide enough to accomodate your foot without allowing excess movement, have about 1/2" of room at the toe, and provide ample arch support for your foot type. I know that's a lot of parameters, but you'll thank yourself later for putting in the extra effort up front.
4. Break in your new boots and socks by performing small movements and working your way up. Don't do a 12 miler out of the gate. You'll probably just deadline your training program for the next two weeks while you recover from all the damage you did to your body.

Here's a true story about a guy who taped his feet at selection. This guy, who will remain nameless, literally walked the soles of his feet off. Countless hours of wet skin and countless more miles finally took their toll. When he got back to the hooch, we all watched in horror as the tape was peeled off, taking most of the skin with it. It smelled like death. You could hear him screaming from the heads when the soap and water from the showers got into the wounds. Now, he had no choice but to let his feet air out at night and then reapply more tape in the morning. At the end of each day, he'd peel off the tape and start the process over. Do you believe he made it to the end and was selected? To this day I've never met anyone as hard as this guy. 99.9% of Marines in his shoes would've quit, or been medically dropped. He kept it a secret from the medics for just that reason. I'm not advocating hiding injuries. I'm just telling you what happened. So,....don't tape your feet.
 

Liarsenic44

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Since this thread was revived and I couldn't find an answer elsewhere on the forums.

Is rucking/hiking in running shoes detrimental? I like to throw in a ruck every once in awhile to keep me used to moving weight across distance while I wait to get promoted again to apply for an A&S slot.
 

Stanimal

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Since this thread was revived and I couldn't find an answer elsewhere on the forums.

Is rucking/hiking in running shoes detrimental? I like to throw in a ruck every once in awhile to keep me used to moving weight across distance while I wait to get promoted again to apply for an A&S slot.
Running shoes are typically constructed of flexible, lightweight materials that allow good flexion on turn over. This works well for most people so long as you are slick. Adding weight may exceed the shoe's ability to rebound and/or absorb shock appropriately. Additionally, boots often have a more rigid sole, or even a plastic or steel shank embedded mid-foot to provide arch support when moving over rugged terrain or conducting load bearing exercises. This feature is not present in most running shoes. If your feet are not conditioned to withstand the abuse of rucking, you may end up with "fallen arches", which results from stretched, damaged or inflamed tendons in the feet.
 

Devildoc

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Running shoes under load is generally suboptimal. They just aren't built for it and they will wear out quick-like. Now, low-cut hiking shoes are a different story, and may be worth a look.
 

Liarsenic44

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Aug 23, 2016
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Running shoes are typically constructed of flexible, lightweight materials that allow good flexion on turn over. This works well for most people so long as you are slick. Adding weight may exceed the shoe's ability to rebound and/or absorb shock appropriately. Additionally, boots often have a more rigid sole, or even a plastic or steel shank embedded mid-foot to provide arch support when moving over rugged terrain or conducting load bearing exercises. This feature is not present in most running shoes. If your feet are not conditioned to withstand the abuse of rucking, you may end up with "fallen arches", which results from stretched, damaged or inflamed tendons in the feet.
Can good quality insoles help prevent fallen arches? What would that feel like anyways?
 

Devildoc

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Insoles might help, likely won't hurt. If you spend the $ to get some, spend good $ and go to someone who specializes in sports podiatry or a store that specializes in running shoes who know what types of insoles are best for a given foot structure.

Fallen arches would have pain in the arches and instep. Heavier guys or wearing weight will exacerbate the issue, especially in soft-soled shoes like running shoes.
 
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