68W

GoNinjaGo

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Jul 31, 2009
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Hey guys. As mentioned in my intro I've dep'ed into the Army as a 68W. I've been doing a lot of reading about what the schooling is going to be like and what the schooling will cover and I've got to say I'm pretty stoked. The one thing I haven't found a lot of information on is what the day to day life a new 68W assigned to a line unit is like before deployments. I was hoping I could get some input from you guys and of course any PM's on the subject are welcome >:{
 

Muppet

Paratrooper
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Depends on what unit you are in. I was a 91B1P in an Airborne Infantry unit in the mid 90's. The standard day consisted on sick call and p.t., medical records upkeep, medical/trauma training, range days with the infantry and what ever the plt. sgt. wanted to do. Most days were medical with rotations to the Airborne clinic for clinical work and maintaining DRF status, 2 hour recall and the like. Lots of training with your prespective infantry plts. and company. EMT training. I went to Paramedic school prior to deploying to Saudi. Hope that helps.

F.M.
 

Viper1

Special Forces
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Train with the line guys as much as you can. Teach them as much as you can for them to do initial work (Stop bleeding, check airway, IV) etc. In multiple casualty situations, those skills are vital. Personal experience with that one during OIF 05-07. Medic was able to concentrate on a critically wounded contractor while my 203 gunner bandaged the other casualty and started an IV. Teaching the soldiers will also help you retain information. Be in shape too. A lot is asked of the medic. If the doc is sucking, it brings everyone down.
 

Muppet

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Train with the line guys as much as you can. Teach them as much as you can for them to do initial work (Stop bleeding, check airway, IV) etc. In multiple casualty situations, those skills are vital. Personal experience with that one during OIF 05-07. Medic was able to concentrate on a critically wounded contractor while my 203 gunner bandaged the other casualty and started an IV. Teaching the soldiers will also help you retain information. Be in shape too. A lot is asked of the medic. If the doc is sucking, it brings everyone down.


Well stated Viper, well stated.

F.M.
 

GoNinjaGo

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Jul 31, 2009
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7
Awesome, thanks for the info guys. I've been reading over first responder text books for some time now and my mom (who's an MA) has been giving me some pointers on stuff like giving IV's and drawing blood.

I've also been kind of lucky in a sense... Our dog got Parvo and I cared for it at home giving Subcutaneous IV's as well as administering pain medication, anti-biotic, and anti nausea medicine via injections. I understand Subcutaneous is a whole different ball game but I've learnt a lot as far as committing to the stab and such.

I've been trying to get my hands on any books that deal with line medics. Unfortunately 98% of them are stories about corpsman (not that there's anything wrong with corpsman :) ), so any and all advice is welcome :D
 

Muppet

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Awesome, thanks for the info guys. I've been reading over first responder text books for some time now and my mom (who's an MA) has been giving me some pointers on stuff like giving IV's and drawing blood.

I've also been kind of lucky in a sense... Our dog got Parvo and I cared for it at home giving Subcutaneous IV's as well as administering pain medication, anti-biotic, and anti nausea medicine via injections. I understand Subcutaneous is a whole different ball game but I've learnt a lot as far as committing to the stab and such.

I've been trying to get my hands on any books that deal with line medics. Unfortunately 98% of them are stories about corpsman (not that there's anything wrong with corpsman :) ), so any and all advice is welcome :D


Sub-Q is not I.V. and heed what people have been telling you. Don't get too deep into all this fancy medical stuff. A+P is your friend. Learn how the body works and forget that I.V. stuff. The best thing you can do, with all respect is to keep your mouth closed and your ears and eyes open and learn from those that have been there and back again. I mean NO disrespect but get knee deep in how the body works and the other stuff will come soon enough. Life in the units is what you make of it. I know you are motivated but slow down brother.

F.M.
 

GoNinjaGo

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No disrespect taken at all, I'm more than happy to absorb anything I can from you guys especially criticism. As far as the IV and phlebotomy stuff goes, It's just something that gets brought up. 2 of my friends are EMT's and like I said, Mom's an MA. It just gets brought up within the context of "Hey saw this in that book you gave me, have you ever had to do that? how/why does that work? " kind of thing.

I'm a junior in college/Science Major so I've had a fair amount of exposure to the life sciences and some exposure to anatomy. I've got a couple of those coloring books ordered I'm just waiting on 'em and in the meantime I'm just trying to make the most of my time before I leave. I'll dump all the other books and just dig into the anatomy. 'ppreciate the advice!

Of course SubQ's aren't IV's, I knew that :doh: I guess that was me talking out of the wrong orifice :confused:.
 

Doc_K

Modern Day Cyclops
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Solid advice given by both FM and Viper!

As the FNG, your most important tasks are going to revolve around emptying the trash and doing whatever hard, manual labor there is that must be done(until a newer guy shows up). :D

You're not to the point Viper said yet, but keep it in mind for when you do get there. You will be expected to keep up with your guys on the line, and to keep them moving. Train them as much as you can, because when it hits the fan, there's no way of guaranteeing that "Doc" is going to be able to be everywhere at once---and, trust me on this one, you're going to want people who know what they're doing if you're the one who needs help. For now, focus on school. What you learn during your AIT is going to serve as the foundation for everything you'll learn later.

And if you'd rather a more colorful version of life through the eyes of a FNG medic, here you go:

Once you reach your assigned duty station, you and the rest of the FNGs will be loaded on to cattle trucks. Packed nut to butt, you'll be taken to your brigade's headquarters. Once there, you and the rest of the fresh meat will be herded on to a stage. Numerous representatives from each battalion will be allowed to "sample the goods." Expect to be jeered, poked, prodded, and inspected. Phrases like "I like that one! The one with the pretty mouth!" or "Get him! He looks like a girl from behind" will be commonly used.

At this point, the brigade CSM will show up and pick out the biggest guy out of the lot to take on a knife fight to the death, just to set an example. naturally, the FNG is going to lose(even if the FNG manages to get a good stab or cut in, it doesn't matter---studies show 100% of all CSMs simply don't require blood to survive anymore). When the fight's over, the CSM will most likely make beef jerky from whatever's left of his opponent.

Once that episode is over, you'll be herded to an arena. It is here that you must compete with the other FNGs in a series of gladiatorial challenges(Bradley-tossing, competitive saline IV drinking, and accessorizing--gotta know how to pick the coolest looking aid bag, you know--just to name a few).

When that's over, you'll finally be given a chance to rest. In the front leaning rest. For approximately 3 days, in hurricane force winds, hail, and raining brimstone. When this is over, your platoon sergeant will finally show up to claim you.

Get some rest at this point, because tomorrow's when the bears come.
 

Muppet

Paratrooper
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Messages
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Solid advice given by both FM and Viper!

As the FNG, your most important tasks are going to revolve around emptying the trash and doing whatever hard, manual labor there is that must be done(until a newer guy shows up). :D

You're not to the point Viper said yet, but keep it in mind for when you do get there. You will be expected to keep up with your guys on the line, and to keep them moving. Train them as much as you can, because when it hits the fan, there's no way of guaranteeing that "Doc" is going to be able to be everywhere at once---and, trust me on this one, you're going to want people who know what they're doing if you're the one who needs help. For now, focus on school. What you learn during your AIT is going to serve as the foundation for everything you'll learn later.

And if you'd rather a more colorful version of life through the eyes of a FNG medic, here you go:

Once you reach your assigned duty station, you and the rest of the FNGs will be loaded on to cattle trucks. Packed nut to butt, you'll be taken to your brigade's headquarters. Once there, you and the rest of the fresh meat will be herded on to a stage. Numerous representatives from each battalion will be allowed to "sample the goods." Expect to be jeered, poked, prodded, and inspected. Phrases like "I like that one! The one with the pretty mouth!" or "Get him! He looks like a girl from behind" will be commonly used.

At this point, the brigade CSM will show up and pick out the biggest guy out of the lot to take on a knife fight to the death, just to set an example. naturally, the FNG is going to lose(even if the FNG manages to get a good stab or cut in, it doesn't matter---studies show 100% of all CSMs simply don't require blood to survive anymore). When the fight's over, the CSM will most likely make beef jerky from whatever's left of his opponent.

Once that episode is over, you'll be herded to an arena. It is here that you must compete with the other FNGs in a series of gladiatorial challenges(Bradley-tossing, competitive saline IV drinking, and accessorizing--gotta know how to pick the coolest looking aid bag, you know--just to name a few).

When that's over, you'll finally be given a chance to rest. In the front leaning rest. For approximately 3 days, in hurricane force winds, hail, and raining brimstone. When this is over, your platoon sergeant will finally show up to claim you.

Get some rest at this point, because tomorrow's when the bears come.



Priceless, absolutely fucking priceless. LMFAO and I will for a while. Thanks for that one.

F.M.}:-)
 

HeloMedic1171

Witch Doctor
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Messages
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el desierto
Wow, K. just, WOW. :)

I wish he wasn't kidding.... :( stupid Bradley... threw out my back on the second round.



In all seriousness, my brothers have given you sage advice, and Viper too. (don't tell x SF, he'll never forgive me for complementing an LT... :eek: ) but I have my own take I will add here: your brain should be a sponge. while I applaud your pro-activity, the best thing you can do, to get to a line unit, is be the grey-man, do lots of PT, and get through basic with flying colors and a fit body. despite what you might hear, if you expect to be "Doc" and not "that fuckin' medic" you will need to be strong, fast, AND smart. keep reading, keep coloring.... good stuff. but take the advice the above guys have given you, and wait til you earn that AMEDD shield on the right side. then it's time to worry about the big picture. til then - do PT, learn some military knowledge, and get through basic. that is an always will be, step #1. once you have completed step #1, step #2 is very easy to hear, but less easy to do - study your filthy fucking FNG ass off. you are a soldier, but barely. it's kinda like the difference between Play-doh, Clay, and terra-cotta statues. by AIT, you'll be harder, but still flexible. it's time to be molded. learn, listen, study, repeat. and do PT. 12 oz curls are ok in moderation, but back them up with preacher curls or push-ups, running and the like, savvy? once you get through AIT..... take those nuggets and pearls my brothers have given you (you still have them, don't you? I told you to save them!!! >:{ ) and read them again.

if you are blessed with a platoon straight off (expect not to, but ask anyway) then immerse yourself. get to know them, listen to the NCOs, and do work right beside them. I'll stop there because I believe FM, DocK, and Viper put it better than I can. IF you're left in the aid station, go back to sponge-mode. people are watching you, and you are paying your dues. we all do it at one point or another, and trust me, that aid station medicine come in handy in the field and in the combat zone. (when your joes aren't getting shot at, what are they doing? playing sports, lifting weights, and eating local food they shouldn't be.)

This is, at times, a thankless, sanity-sucking, and mind-numbingly irritating job.... but it's all worth it that one time when someone looks at you an says "Thank you, Doc." there are few better feelings in this world, hands down. I am biased, but I think I have the best job in the Army, and I wouldn't do anything else. congrats on picking a job that will give you great satisfaction and endless pride, if you apply yourself.... you have, in this thread alone, three of the proudest "Docs" ever to leave Ft Sam Houston.

best of luck.
 
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