Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vheicle (MRAP)

Queen Beach

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Wonder if the Army will adapt:

Troops in Iraq get safer vehicle
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By Lance Cpl. Charles Howard, USMC
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U.S. Marines look over a mine resistant ambush protected vehicle, or MRAP, in Iraq.


swapContent('firstHeader','applyHeader');By Tom Vanden Brook, USA TODAY
WASHINGTON — The Pentagon will phase out its armored Humvees in Iraq and Afghanistan and send in vehicles that better withstand roadside bomb blasts, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Wednesday.
Replacing the Humvee, the military's main troop-transport vehicle, will be the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle, known as an MRAP. Military officials say the new vehicles provide twice as much protection against improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which cause 70% of all U.S. casualties in Iraq.
Armored Humvees were "the best we had," Gates said. "Now we have something better, and we're going to get that to the field as best we can."
No Marines had been killed in the 300 attacks on Marine MRAPs in Anbar province, USA TODAY reported on April 19. Last week, two Army soldiers were killed when a bomb struck their MRAP in Iraq.
Humvees have had a tortured history since the Iraq war started in March 2003. Few had armor in the early months of the war, but the rise of IEDs led troops to add their own armor. Then Congress pushed the Pentagon to buy armor kits and new, fully armored Humvees. The added armor, though, made it more likely for the Humvee to roll over, and its heavier doors trapped soldiers inside after an attack or accident.
Getting the MRAPs is "the highest priority Department of Defense acquisition program," Gates said in a memo last week to the secretaries of the Army and Navy. In that memo, first reported Wednesday by InsideDefense.com, Gates said he was concerned the Marines has ordered 3,700 of the vehicles, while the Army only sought 2,500. The Army has about 100,000 troops in Iraq; the Marines have 25,000.
Gates and other Pentagon officials plan to meet Friday to determine how many more vehicles the military will buy. "My understanding … is that the Army has been recalibrating its interest and has substantially increased the number of these vehicles they think they can use," Gates said.
The new vehicles feature a V-shaped hull that disperses explosions from below. All services have ordered a total of 7,700 MRAPs for $8 billion over the next 18 months, but Gates indicated the Pentagon could buy many more.
The Army now has 18,000 armored Humvees in Iraq. It originally planned to spend another $2.5 billion this year to buy more, Army budget records show.
Army spokesman Paul Boyce said Wednesday the service has 1,100 mine-protected vehicles in Iraq. The MRAP won't completely replace the Humvee in Iraq or future conflicts, he said.
Gates said production capacity is "nowhere near what it needs to be to meet the demand on the part of either the Army or the Marine Corps."
In January, the Marines awarded testing and development contracts for the MRAP to nine different defense contractors. A Marine contract for 1,000 MRAPs awarded last month indicated the order would be completed by May 2008.
It's about time the Pentagon changed to the MRAP, said Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., who has advocated for buying more of the vehicles. "I am glad they finally get it," he said.
Gates said Wednesday he learned of the Marines' success with the vehicles from a newspaper article he did not identify. "That certainly got my attention."
It also indicates that future U.S. adversaries will mimic the insurgents' use of IEDs, which "have now been recognized as a national Achilles' heel," said Michael O'Hanlon, an analyst at the Brookings Institution. "If you're the military, you'd better fix it."


Gates Hopes to Get Better Armored Vehicles to Troops Faster

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, May 10, 2007 – Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates is exploring ways to speed up the timetable for getting more Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicles to troops in Iraq. Gates told reporters during yesterday’s Pentagon news conference that he’s impressed by what he’s read about the MRAPs and the improved troop protection they offer over up-armored Humvees.

He cited an article that noted that no Marines had been killed during 300 incidents in which their MRAPs were involved in improvised-explosive-device attacks. “That certainly got my attention,” he said.

The MRAP’s raised, V-shaped underbelly deflects the force of IEDs and other blasts from below.

Sixty-five MRAPs in use in Iraq are saving Marines’ lives, Lt. Gen. Emerson Garner, the Marine Corps’ deputy commandant for programs and resources, told a congressional committee earlier this year.

“Our experience is that Marines in these vehicles have been four or five times safer than a Marine in an armored Humvee,” Garner told members of the House and Senate Sea Power and Expeditionary Forces subcommittees. “Based on this experience, we recently decided to replace our armored Humvees in theater on a one-for-one basis with MRAPs.”

Gates said he supports that effort and hopes to get the Army to speed up its procurement timetable for the vehicles, too. “My understanding … is that the Army has been recalibrating its interest and has substantially increased the number of these vehicles they think they can use,” he said.

The services have ordered about 7,700 of the vehicles, at a cost of about $8 billion. Gates plan to meet with Army and Marine Corps officials tomorrow to discuss their MRAP procurement plans and explore ways to accelerate them.

Up-armored Humvees offered the best protection available when they were fielded, but Gates said MRAPs provide even more. “Now we have something better, and we’re going to get that to the field as best we can,” he said.

Marine Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, called MRAPs an example of how industry has stepped up to the plate to come up with solutions to military needs. “I think what you have is a natural evolution of technology and very sharp people in business and industry looking at the problem and devising different ways to defeat the problem,” he said.

While acknowledging the benefit of the MRAPs, Pace cautioned that they don’t represent an end-all to the dangers of IEDs.

“There’s no solution out there that’s going to protect everybody from everything all the time,” he said. “What you try to do is … provide the best protection you can that still allows a soldier (or) Marine to be able to go out and do the job they need to do.”

Giving every deployed troop a private M-1 Abrams tank would probably be the best protection, but even tanks are vulnerable to some weapons, Pace said.

He added that most jobs required in the combat zone can’t be accomplished while rumbling around the city inside a tank.

“So you’ve got to find the right balance between force protection and the mission that needs to be done,” he said.
 

275ANGER!

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New armored truck sees first Iraq death

This must have been one hell of an IED.


BAGHDAD - A soldier killed over the weekend south of Baghdad was the first American casualty in a roadside bomb attack on a newly introduced, heavily armored vehicle, a military spokeswoman said Tuesday.

The V-shaped hull of the huge MRAP — Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected — truck is designed to deflect blasts from roadside bombs, a weapon that has killed more American soldiers than any other tactic used by Sunni insurgents and militia fighters in Iraq.

The soldier who died Saturday was the gunner who sits atop the MRAP vehicle. Three crew members tucked inside the cabin were wounded. The vehicle rolled over after the blast and it was not clear how the gunner died — from wounds in the explosion or in the subsequent roll-over.

Maj. Alayne P. Conway, deputy spokeswoman for the 3rd Infantry Division, said the attack and the death were under investigation.

There now are more than 1,500 of the costly vehicles in service in Iraq and the Pentagon is working to get at least 12,000 more, using $21 billion provided by Congress. MRAPs cost between $500,000 and $1 million, depending on their size and how they are equipped.

The sophisticated vehicles are being built and put into service in a bid to provide soldiers and Marines more protection than is offered by armored Humvees, which have flat bottoms that absorb the shock waves from a blast. The bottom of an MRAP also is 36 inches above the ground, while Humvees sit much closer to the roadway.


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080122...icles_death;_ylt=Au1IGEuQw_WR7MsKTkvlMZhvaA8F
 
B

Boondocksaint375

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I have a powerpoint on one of these at work. And IED fucked the entire thing up, but the people inside survived. One broke a couple ribs, but that was it.
 

pardus

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The pentagon etc... Should hang their sorry heads in shame.

This type of vehicle was looked at in the early 80's in Africa and was rejected despite the proven effectiveness of it's troop protection!

How many troops would still be alive if these vehicle were adopted back then?

That said, VERY glad to see it's finally in service here, a great move!
 

car

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The pentagon etc... Should hang their sorry heads in shame.

This type of vehicle was looked at in the early 80's in Africa and was rejected despite the proven effectiveness of it's troop protection!

How many troops would still be alive if these vehicle were adopted back then?

That said, VERY glad to see it's finally in service here, a great move!

Not gonna defend the US military procurement system - it's been so broken that MacGyver couldn't fix it. But I have to say that the process is now way better. We're fielding new shit in months that in the past would have taken years - to the point where the weapon/system had become irrelevant. Again, not defending a fucking thing they've done or not done - it's just better than it was.
 

pardus

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Very glad to hear it, war will do that to a military, only to revert quickly to the normal BS after its all over :(
 
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