Spy for China Gets Long Sentence

Marauder06

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Wow, 24 years is a long sentence. I'm pleasantly surprised he got such a stiff penalty.

SANTA ANA, Calif. - A Chinese-born engineer convicted of conspiracy to export U.S. defense technology to China was sentenced Monday to 24½ years in federal prison by a judge who said the defendant betrayed his adopted country.
 
Sorry dudealeros/dudealeras - I think this fucker should have gotten life - at a minimum.

"I love my country..." Which country is that?

How many espionage cases in the last ten years have involved naturalized Chinese working in the high-tech/defense industry? Just something to chew on. :uhh:

The war is still on, and it's still cold......:2c:
 
Sorry dudealeros/dudealeras - I think this fucker should have gotten life - at a minimum.

"I love my country..." Which country is that?

How many espionage cases in the last ten years have involved naturalized Chinese working in the high-tech/defense industry? Just something to chew on. :uhh:

The war is still on, and it's still cold......:2c:

So true... just more players now days!
 
He continued to lie, and really didn't show remorse. That's why the judge hammerred him.

The sentence also sends a message to potential spies. He will probably die behind bars, which is good. His family will never see him again, which is good.

Screw him!
 
How many espionage cases in the last ten years have involved naturalized Chinese working in the high-tech/defense industry? Just something to chew on.
This has been going on for some time now, and I am not pleased about it. Sometimes I think that certain elements in the government are looking the other way and turning a blind eye to Chinese espionage in order to continue with a "business as usual" economic trading partner development with China...
 
Almost never utilized. I believe the rationale is, we need the guy alive so we can determine the extent of the betrayal and the damage done. The only real baragaining chip is taking the death penalty off the table. I don't know when was the last time we actually executed someone for espionage... maybe the Rosenbergs?
 
I'm not sure what she did was espionage, it was more like collaboration or sedition or something. Can we get a legal opinion on this one?:D
 
Almost never utilized. I believe the rationale is, we need the guy alive so we can determine the extent of the betrayal and the damage done. The only real baragaining chip is taking the death penalty off the table. I don't know when was the last time we actually executed someone for espionage... maybe the Rosenbergs?

I think you're right - on both the reason we're keeping him alive and on the Rosenburg's being the last executions for treason.
 
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