These are some pictures of the Brazilian Police (SWAT) doing their thing…

Diamondback 2/2

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These are some pictures of the Brazilian Police (SWAT) doing their thing…

“WARNING” These are pictures containing dead people! Do not scroll down, if you are offended by pictures of dead bad guys…












I am sure most of you have been keeping up with what’s been spreading in South America. I am thinking that there will be a ton of work in that region, for many years to follow… Looks like the Brazilian Police are staying on top of their game…












Pictures are from RIO DE JANEIRO according to the eamil I recieved...


RIO1.jpg


RIO2.jpg


RIO3.jpg


RIO4.jpg


RIO5.jpg
 

Diamondback 2/2

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I have some friends from Brazil who are former policemen and now perform a lot of training around the world. Although their methods are truly different then many methods used in the United States, they are also dealing with an extremely different population.

I don’t have any first hand experience in Brazil, so I wont form an opinion on their policing methods or tactics…
 

HOLLiS

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I have some friends from Brazil who are former policemen and now perform a lot of training around the world. Although their methods are truly different then many methods used in the United States, they are also dealing with an extremely different population.

I don’t have any first hand experience in Brazil, so I wont form an opinion on their policing methods or tactics…

I ran a cross a article some time back, may be a year or so, on the gangs in Brazil. It did not paint the police in a negative way. The gangs were real bad. Assuming my memory is working.
 

Diamondback 2/2

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I ran a cross a article some time back, may be a year or so, on the gangs in Brazil. It did not paint the police in a negative way. The gangs were real bad. Assuming my memory is working.


No you are right, they have most of the common issues that are found from Mexico on down. Mexico is really experiencing the flux, however from what I understand a majority of south America has been experiencing these crime waves for many years…


CRIME: Crime throughout Brazil has reached very high levels. The Brazilian police and the Brazilian press report that the rate of crime continues to rise, especially in the major urban centers – though it is also spreading in rural areas. Brazil’s murder rate is more than four times higher than that of the U.S. Rates for other crimes are similarly high. The majority of crimes are not solved. There were several reported rapes against American citizens in 2006.
Street crime remains a problem for visitors and local residents alike, especially in the evenings and late at night. Foreign tourists are often targets of crime and Americans are not exempt. This targeting occurs in all tourist areas but is especially problematic in Rio de Janeiro, Salvador and Recife.
Caution is advised with regard to nighttime travel through more rural areas and satellite cities due to reported incidents of roadside robberies that randomly target passing vehicles. Robbery and “quicknapping” outside of banks and ATM machines are common. In a “quicknapping,” criminals abduct victims for a short time in order to receive a quick payoff from the family, business or the victim’s ATM card. Some victims have been beaten and/or raped.
The incidence of crime against tourists is greater in areas surrounding beaches, hotels, discotheques, bars, nightclubs, and other similar establishments that cater to visitors. This type of crime is especially prevalent during Carnaval (Brazilian Mardi Gras), but takes place throughout the year. While the risk is greater at dusk and during the evening hours, street crime can occur both day and night, and even safer areas of cities are not immune. Incidents of theft on city buses are frequent and visitors should avoid such transportation. Several Brazilian cities have established specialized tourist police units to patrol areas frequented by tourists. In Rio de Janeiro, crime continues to plague the major tourist areas (see separate section on Rio de Janeiro).
At airports, hotel lobbies, bus stations and other public places, incidents of pick pocketing, theft of hand carried luggage, and laptop computers are common. Travelers should "dress down" when outside and avoid carrying valuables or wearing jewelry or expensive watches. "Good Samaritan" scams are common. If a tourist looks lost or seems to be having trouble communicating, a seemingly innocent bystander offering help may victimize them. Care should be taken at and around banks and internationally connected automatic teller machines that take U.S. credit or debit cards. Very poor neighborhoods known as "favelas," such as those located on steep hillsides in Rio de Janeiro, are found throughout Brazil. These areas are sites of uncontrolled criminal activity and are often not patrolled by police. U.S. citizens are advised to avoid these unsafe areas. Carjacking is on the increase in Sao Paulo, Recife and other cities.

Travelers using personal ATMs or credit cards sometimes receive billing statements with non-authorized charges after returning from a visit to Brazil. The Embassy and Consulates have received numerous reports from both official Americans and tourists who have had their cards cloned or duplicated without their knowledge. Those using such payment methods should carefully monitor their banking online for the duration of their visit.
While the ability of Brazilian police to help recover stolen property is limited, it is nevertheless strongly advised to obtain a "boletim de ocorrencia" (police report) at a "delegacia" (police station) whenever any possessions are lost or stolen. This will facilitate the traveler's exit from Brazil and insurance claims.

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1072.html

“Quicknapping” is an interesting term; I have had that happen to me on more then one occasion in Mexico… Normally cost about $1000, but don’t ever let them know you are US Military… I have not returned to Mexico since I got my “Army” tattoo… One of the dumbest things I ever did :doh:
 

pardus

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What's with the dude in the first pic with no arms or a head?

"Yes sir, he was injured while resisting arrest"

"Sounds reasonable officer, good job" lol

If you want to see a great movie about this, watch City Of God.

I can't be too critical of the cops there, it is out of control!
 

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Sadly the BBC use to have a great reputation. Maybe, Maybe not. I don't trust the BBC to report on anything even the weather.

I suggest that you run a google and/or other search on this subject. You will find plenty of articles other than the BBC on the methods of the police, especially in that city. Many executions of street kids by off duty police death squads, etc.

http://www.brazzilmag.com/content/view/1884/

BTW: I'll be visiting that city very soon, along with many other places in South America.
 

HOLLiS

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I suggest that you run a google and/or other search on this subject. You will find plenty of articles other than the BBC on the methods of the police, especially in that city. Many executions of street kids by off duty police death squads, etc.

http://www.brazzilmag.com/content/view/1884/

BTW: I'll be visiting that city very soon, along with many other places in South America.

Thanks for the heads up.

H.
 

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Basically what I have understood about Brazil, and this statements from former Brazilian policemen and a few Texas police officer who have done joint training down there. Is that portion of the country is not government controlled and is some what run by militias/ gangs. In some areas of the cities there is little to no policing or government control.

Yes they have corrupted police and government officials, but that is South America. Being a police officer down there is kind of like being a US Soldier patrolling Sadar city Iraq…

As I said I have no first hand knowledge in Brazil and the pictures were forwarded to me from the owner of C.A.T.I. Something to the effect of the police staying busy in Rio de Janeiro. He did not include any further background of the pictures, to include the background on the mutilated body in the first picture.

Something else to take note of in the first picture, is the uniform of the body second from the left. Don't look like some little kid being shot by corrupted police IMO. More so looking like a war of control...

TW no need to say, watch your 360 down there. ;)
 
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7point62

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"Killed in a shootout with Police" is how all these guys died, even if their heads were chopped off or each one has a nice clean hole right through the cabeza.

It's just the way they do things. ;) Certain Columbian units used to leave notes on the bods, to send a message.
 

JBS

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These kids need to stop with the botox and collagen injections. Angelina Jolie has enough lips to go around.

RIO5.jpg


angelina%20jolie%20lips.jpg




SECOND PIC down, post #2, that is some serious volume of fire that went down there, on the wall, up to the 2nd floor.
 
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