Treating Dogs In A War Zone

QC

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I thought Pardus may have an interest in this one.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/n.../json8.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/index.jsonp

Tending to a military dog that had collapsed in the 110 degree heat, Sergeant Joseloff, 34, leaned on what he knew about treating humans in similar situations.
He covered the dog in a wet blanket, applied electrolyte gel and ordered the helicopter to fly with its doors open. The dog, however, refused to drink water.
The dog survived, but the experience unsettled Sergeant Joseloff, a pararescueman in the New York Air National Guard. “I just kind of winged it,” he said. “I think I got lucky. That was an eye opener.”
 

SkrewzLoose

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Good on ya, PJ. Very interesting article. With these dogs playing the vital role that they do, there's no reason there shouldn't be medics trained and equipped to treat them as well.
 

pardus

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Dogs dont do great in heat. Good save PJ.

Good on ya, PJ. Very interesting article. With these dogs playing the vital role that they do, there's no reason there shouldn't be medics trained and equipped to treat them as well.

Its hard enough keeping medics trained to treat humans. We have vet techs for animals.
 

SkrewzLoose

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Is that due to lack of trainers, lack of interest from the onset or guys who get the training, decide they don't like it and get out or go elsewhere?
And humans absolutely take priority in regards to medical treatment in the field.
 

amlove21

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I thought Pardus may have an interest in this one.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/nyregion/at-a-long-island-animal-hospital-learning-how-to-treat-military-dogs.html?src=un&feedurl=http://json8.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/index.jsonp

Tending to a military dog that had collapsed in the 110 degree heat, Sergeant Joseloff, 34, leaned on what he knew about treating humans in similar situations.
He covered the dog in a wet blanket, applied electrolyte gel and ordered the helicopter to fly with its doors open. The dog, however, refused to drink water.
The dog survived, but the experience unsettled Sergeant Joseloff, a pararescueman in the New York Air National Guard. “I just kind of winged it,” he said. “I think I got lucky. That was an eye opener.”

This man is a close personal friend of mine. Mark is an awesome PJ, and a credit to the NY J's. I am truly proud to call him my brother. Unless he is reading this- in which case, Mark, you owe me for dinner. Thanks for losing the argument. :thumbsup:

Good on ya, PJ. Very interesting article. With these dogs playing the vital role that they do, there's no reason there shouldn't be medics trained and equipped to treat them as well.
Any time I have supported any team with MWD's, it is in our protocol to familiarize yourself with the animal and the trainer, and review your trauma procedures for the MWD. Surprisingly, they are VERY close to the trauma TX for a human. As a matter of fact, if we are supporting an op with MWD's, and a "new guy" isnt familiar with animals, I simply say "Dude, do what you would do for a human. Stop the bleeding, get them breathing, get them leaving. Treat the pain and put the dose in 1/3, only use opiods or ketamine. If you need anything other than that ask for help." It works.

Is that due to lack of trainers, lack of interest from the onset or guys who get the training, decide they don't like it and get out or go elsewhere?
And humans absolutely take priority in regards to medical treatment in the field.


I am only speaking for myself. Humans have priority, HOWEVER- an MWD is a military member, a US citizen the same as any other. They are treated accordingly. If I have a mildly injured human and a seriously injured MWD, I am working the MWD. I was originally going to say "False, humans do not take priority every time", but decided to frame it a little differently. I will tell you that the MWD is a member of the TEAM. He/She gets treated as such.
 

policemedic

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Doctrine says something other than people have medical priority?

amlove21 beat me to it. Care is prioritized by severity of injuries. A MWD that is triaged to a higher category than PV1 Snuffy is supposed to be treated first. The MWD is a Soldier.

Of course, that's playing strictly by the rules. And it goes without saying that given equal triage categories the human wins, every time.

This can present an ethical problem, there's no question of that. I have video of a scenario used at USUHS to teach this very concept and force the examination of the ethics involved, but I'm having a problem uploading it.
 

policemedic

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It's kind of funny this came up, because there's an article in the most recent JSOM about hyperthermia in SOF multi-purpose canines. It presents an intriguing view that SOF MPCs have a different risk profile than other MWDs, which is something I had not previously considered. It's obvious military dogs are exposed to different risks than police dogs, but the authors argue convincingly that the same is true for MWDs and SOF MPCs. If anyone is interested in reading it and isn't a subscriber, let me know.

FWIW, I think it's important for a medic to be able to perform certain procedures on a dog safely if there's a chance they will be working in a unit with a dog or have one TDY'd to them. A partial list includes use of commercial and improvised muzzles, basic wound management, hypo- and hyperthermia treatment, airway management, CPR, needle decompression, IV access (including camel backing, which isn't strictly IV, but...). An injured or KIA dog is a severe blow to morale.
 

pardus

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As a matter of fact, if we are supporting an op with MWD's, and a "new guy" isnt familiar with animals, I simply say "Dude, do what you would do for a human. Stop the bleeding, get them breathing, get them leaving. Treat the pain and put the dose in 1/3, only use opiods or ketamine. If you need anything other than that ask for help." It works.

Sounds pretty good to me FWIW.
 
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