75th Ranger Regiment graduates 56 new Rangers

Ravage

running up that hill
Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2007
Messages
3,865
Location
in Wonderland, with my Alice
http://news.soc.mil/releases/News Archive/2010/March/100316-03.html

FORT BENNING, Ga. (USASOC News Service, March 16, 2010) - The 75th Ranger Regiment’s Ranger Assessment and Selection Program 1 conducted a graduation ceremony at Freedom Hall, March 5.

On Jan. 11, Class 03-10 started with 155 Soldiers. The grueling and demanding nature of the eight-week assessment and selection course gradually reduced the graduating class to 56 Rangers.

More than 200 Family and friends watched proudly as their sons, grandsons, nephews and husbands donned the tan beret that signifies the brotherhood of the 75th Ranger Regiment.

“You have proven you are worthy of wearing that 75th Ranger Regiment scroll,” said RASP 1 graduation speaker, retired Col. Ralph Puckett, former Honorary Colonel of the 75th Ranger Regiment. “When you do, you will be proclaiming to all who see you that you are one of the best Soldiers in the world.”

The Regiment’s initial training and selection program has recently undergone a complete overhaul which aims to ensure graduates are ready for the complex and demanding environment of the constantly evolving special operations battlefield.

“The Ranger Regiment has always prided itself on the quality of Soldier it produces and RASP 1 enhances our capabilities,” said Sgt. 1st Class Tyson Crosby, non-commissioned officer in charge of the RASP 1 program. “RASP 1 is not only designed to teach Soldiers the skills required to become a member of the Regiment, but also to ensure they are physically and mentally prepared to be successful.”

The RASP 1 course is designed to ensure candidates meet the demanding standards for service within the75th Ranger Regiment, as well as arm its graduates with the skills required to be successful in the demanding and high-tempo lifestyle of the Regiment.

“You are a trained and certified Ranger, ready to deploy to combat in a fire team. You don’t have to take a backseat to any Ranger who has gone before you,” said Puckett. “You have met and exceeded standards that previous graduates met. You are a Ranger who has earned the right, the honor and the responsibility of calling yourself a U.S. Army Ranger.”

Spc. Andrew Reid, a native of Norwich, New York, joined the Army after receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in history from The College of Brockport State University of New York. He is also the recipient of the Class Leader Award and has dreamt about being a U.S. Army Ranger since he was a little boy.

“To be part of this Regiment is truly an honor,” said Reid. “I feel privileged. This is something I chose, I think it’s every man’s responsibility to fight for his country. This is what I want and I’m honored. This is a dream come true.”

Reid’s Ranger buddy, Pfc. Schuyller Nagorski, a combat medic and the class honor graduate agrees.

“I feel privileged to be here and to be a part of this unit,” said Nagorski.

Nagorski, a native of Tacoma, Wash., and graduate of Franklin Pierce High School, said he joined the Army because he wanted the character and discipline of his parents, who are both retired E-7s and the teamwork of being a U.S. Army Ranger.

“You can’t succeed without your Ranger Buddy to your left and to your right,” said Nagorski. “I want to make sure that if my men go down, hopefully they never will, but they have confidence in me and my skills as a combat medic, that I will be there and I will not give up on them.”

“We , the Rangers of yesterday, are depending on you, the Rangers of today and tomorrow, to protect our freedom so that our grandchildren may enjoy the benefits that we have had,” concluded Puckett. “Rangers lead the way!”

About the 75th Ranger Regiment:

The 75th Ranger Regiment is a lethal, agile and flexible force, capable of executing a myriad of complex, joint special operations missions in support of U.S. policy and objectives.

Today’s Ranger Regiment is the Army’s premier raid force. Each of the four geographically dispersed Ranger battalions are always combat ready, mentally and physically tough and prepared to fight the War on Terrorism.

Their capabilities include air assault and direct action raids seizing key terrain such as airfields, destroying strategic facilities, and capturing or killing enemies of the Nation.

Rangers are capable of conducting squad through regimental size operations using a variety of infiltration techniques including airborne, air assault and ground platforms.

The Regiment remains an all-volunteer force with an intensive screening and selection process followed by combat-focused training.

Rangers are resourced to maintain exceptional proficiency, experience and readiness. The 75th Ranger Regiment is a proud unit and a team of teams serving the Nation - Rangers Lead the Way!

mtukhz.jpg

Retired Col. Ralph Puckett places the hard-earned 75th Ranger Regiment scroll on Pfc. Nathan Lively at the Ranger Assessment and Selection 1 graduation, March 5. (Photo provided by 75th Ranger Regiment Public Affairs)

So RIP has been replaced by RAS ?
 

phridum

Chicks Dig The Long Shot
Verified Sniper
Joined
Jan 4, 2008
Messages
62
Location
New Jersey
Is there a difference between a Combat Medic and a Ranger Medic?

It's my understanding from a .pdf application form I came across that to be a Medic in the Ranger Battalion you need to apply prior to attending RASP (RIP in the doc I saw). Upon acceptance, you attend Airborne if you need to, go to RASP/RIP, if you get accepted to that, you attend Phase I of the 18D course which is 27 weeks long and includes a month of trauma training at on inner city hospital. However, if you don't make it you get released. Would that be from the Battalion, or just the Medic role and you still fill a role within the Battalion?
 

275ANGER!

Angry Member
Verified SOF
Joined
Nov 29, 2007
Messages
494
Location
Front Leaning Rest
Is there a difference between a Combat Medic and a Ranger Medic?

It's my understanding from a .pdf application form I came across that to be a Medic in the Ranger Battalion you need to apply prior to attending RASP (RIP in the doc I saw). Upon acceptance, you attend Airborne if you need to, go to RASP/RIP, if you get accepted to that, you attend Phase I of the 18D course which is 27 weeks long and includes a month of trauma training at on inner city hospital. However, if you don't make it you get released. Would that be from the Battalion, or just the Medic role and you still fill a role within the Battalion?

All Ranger Medics must complete SOCM, failure to do so results in being dropped by Regiment and sent to the regular Army. Newly graduated RASP medics are held at Regiment awaiting their slots for SOCM, pretty much studying at/with Regimental T3. After they complete SOCM and are assigned to a Battalion they are expected to attend and complete Ranger School at some point.
 

Centermass

Ranger
Rest In Peace
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Messages
2,891
Location
Whoville
So can anyone sign up to be a Ranger Medic or must you be a medic already?

There is a current backlog of 68's waiting on SOCM. Ones that already have the 68 portion of it complete and have the OPT40 will more than likely have priority to attend. Based on that, if you want into Regiment, you may want to try a different route.

On another note, 56 of 155 passed.

Almost a hundred now worldwide who didn't make it.....

Congratulations to all those who did.
 

dknob

Ranger
Verified SOF
Joined
May 8, 2009
Messages
1,492
Location
Denver, CO
36 percent passing rate. Thats what I like to see. Similar to my class, 42 out of 150+. Last year when I heard of a class with 70 % passing, I had cardiac arrest.
 

dknob

Ranger
Verified SOF
Joined
May 8, 2009
Messages
1,492
Location
Denver, CO
I think its seasonally dependent. Like 70 dudes quit within 1 hour of cole range night 1 because it was like 30 degrees and pouring rain. Next night it was close to 60 cus of the same cold and wet conditions. I wonder what would have happened if it was spring or fall. So probably the training system is flawed if the cadre cannot replicate demanding or stressful conditions every time around, but that is not really their fault.
 

Diesel_Actual

Banned
Joined
May 3, 2010
Messages
66
"Reid’s Ranger buddy, Pfc. Schuyler Nagorski, a combat medic and the class honor graduate agrees."

Well It's good to see a fellow Schuyler out there that spells the name the proper way.
Bravo Zulu
 
Top