Books for EMS and Combat Medicine

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G-Man222

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I've been reading into anatomy and physiology books quite extensively, even been reading up on a few MD books.

Personally, for one persuing a career as a Medic (hopefully one day a 68W1VW1) what kind of readings would you recommend?

Any/all FMs concerning Infantry, Anti-Air, Military Police, Cavalry Operations, Military Intelligence including PSYOPS and Civil Affairs well, I've read every single one cover to cover I've gotten a hold of. (which is pretty much all of them, especially HUMINT Operations. although it's totally unrelated to Medics. but just putting that info out there, book info on leadership, as well as all possible unit assignments as a 68W I've already read, looking towards the actual Medic stuff, can't find very many Army Medic FMs. and the ones I have found, are outdated... 1998)

Army Ranger Medic Handbook I already plan on getting a hold of via http://www.narescue.com/Ranger-Medic-Handbook-P183C144.aspx

But are there any other reading materials anyone would recommend?

I've been told by several sources to look at bradybooks. But not exactly quite sure what to look for specifically. Because I've done searches on there, and browsed, especially towards the Paramedic stuff, and it's got quite a selection. Personally, don't quite know where to start.

Any recommendations of readings are welcome. And perhaps multiple others on this site looking towards combat medicine may find the reading list helpful as well. (essentially, creating a resource of quick reference medical books to study up on for others not just including myself)

I've been lectured by a lot of Medics, (and Infantrymen when I've spoken a bit about going Medic route) their advice everytime I've asked, was to take thoughts of Air Assault, Sapper School, and all other Army Schools non-Medic related, and toss 'em out the window. Because if I become a Medic, every Ranger in my platoon, or every Soldier in general in my unit, I'm responsible for. and if my medical skills aren't greater than all my other skills... I'm (please excuse the language) fucked as a Medic.

And especially apparently since in Regiment, only the best Medics are sent to Ranger School (to gain/improve leadership skills to compliment medical skills in the field) Ranger School per se isn't (respectfully) "That big on my mind" compared to just being able to prove myself to earn a Scroll. But none the less, I've been told I'd be expected to be the best from day one, with no excuses.

So, list of readings may be quite helpful, to get a good solid background on paper what I'll learn to do hands-on, as well as I'd be able to provide the best quality of care to the Soldiers who I'd be assigned to. (being an asset, instead of a problem)

Honestly, unlike a lot of junior Soldiers, and other wananbes, I'd rather be the best in my profession, and gain rank/responsibility slowly, than to not have a clue about my profession, and gain rank and responsibility fast. If that makes sense?

Any advice/recommendations of readings would be greatly appreciated.
 
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arizonaguide

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I would say Anatomy and Physiology are a good start.
Then any "first responder" emergency medical books you can get your hands on.
Chemistry (all, inc. lotsa organic), Biology (all, inc. microbiology).

And if it was me I'd read (memorize and understand) every word of every technique, on every single link on this page:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/FirstAidIndex/FirstAidIndex
 

AWP

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Here's a thread for you medical types out there, everyone else gets to watch the carnage.
 
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G-Man222

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More:
Anything to do with getting your EMT, and CPR certifications.
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/ems/pub/frnsc.pdf

etc...

I'm very grateful, may I ask what you googled for this particular link?

I've read First Responder to Intermediate. (because my brother is a FEMA fanatic, :uhh: and EMT is something he wanted to do since we were kids) but is there one particularly like this that's NREMT-P?

Diseases and Conditions I've studied quite a bit from MD textbooks (and stuff from the NIH I've gotten my hands on) Are there any type of books/sites that have that list of conditions etc. but also how to treat them? (I know some require anti-biotics, some require surgical procedures, and some require both etc)

In particular I've looked into treatments for dysentery, typhus, and several other bacterial infections. (there are quite a few)

But is there any list of what a Medic in a third world country would encounter? (I know the 18Ds would know of a few) I can do the research into the conditions no prob, and types of treatments as well.

I understand there are full encyclopedia's on medical conditions ranging from a simple ingrown hair, to a myocardial infarction with femoral artery pseudoaneurysm due to being shot. (The rapid sensation of pain from a gunshot wound to an artery, with immediate blood loss can cause shock, and create a heart attack) But what kind of conditions are most "typically" found "In the field" and what conditions are "sometimes" found in the "field"?

Worse case scenario, what are the worse conditions Medics (this includes all branches, and all types of units) see often, and not so often?

I can do the research into what exactly they are speaking of, no prob. Just trying to learn the info so I could get to work in looking into them.
 

TLDR20

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I would just worry about A&P if I were you. Maybe a PHTLS book would help a little ( it took me 3 times to pass that PHTLS test) Don't get too wrapped up in all this stuff man. Your still in school, use your new in shape body to go get yourself laid.

And another thing if you are a 68W1 you will know a shit-ton about your profession.
 

surgicalcric

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G-man:
Can you get yourself into an EMT-Basic course? If you can thats where you should start. If not pick up an Anatomy and Physiology Coloring book and an Anatomy/Physiology textbook from your local bookstore and start reading/coloring... Good medicine begins with great knowledge of the body.

I would advise against picking up any medical texts (to read on your own) until such a time that you know what you are reading, how it applies and when (see coloring book and A&P text.) 25 meter fucking target!!
 
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arizonaguide

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Can you get yourself into an EMT-Basic course? If you can thats where you should start.
25 meter fucking target!!
Yup! Do you have a Community College EMT class nearby?

Example:
Mosby's EMT-Basic Textbook Revised 2nd Edition Revised
W. Stoy, T. Platt, D. Lejeune and the Center for Emergency Medicine, published by Mosby
Mosby's EMT-Basic Workbook 2nd Edition
W. Stoy, T. Platt, D. Lejeune and the Center for Emergency Medicine, published by Mosby.
Example of the testing you have a lot to learn for:
http://www.emt-national-training.com/intermediate-practice-tests.php


Lots to learn G-man. It's a full time job! Like Surg says: FOCUS on the basics (in order) first.
I understand your wanting to be a sponge and learn it ALL, (RIGHT NOW dammit!).
I have a similar way of thinking sometimes, but If this is your choice, get serious about FOCUS.
Step by step.
 

Totentanz

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Yup! Do you have a Community College EMT class nearby?

Example:
Mosby's EMT-Basic Textbook Revised 2nd Edition Revised
W. Stoy, T. Platt, D. Lejeune and the Center for Emergency Medicine, published by Mosby
Mosby's EMT-Basic Workbook 2nd Edition
W. Stoy, T. Platt, D. Lejeune and the Center for Emergency Medicine, published by Mosby.


http://www.emt-national-training.com/intermediate-practice-tests.php

To further this line of thought... sometimes volunteer EMS/Fire agencies will pay for your training. Some (not all) will require a certain amount of service to the agency in exchange (eg, the FD down the road from where I grew required that you remain with them for 6 months, and respond to a certain percentage of calls). Other EMS organizations had an understanding that you would put the training to use for them, but nothing binding you to it.*

I'm not highly familiar with the field, but that might be a good way to start with formal education and some hands on experience.:2c:

*just note that in my limited experience with them, this rarely extended past EMT-B...
 
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G-Man222

Guest
I'm leaving for Job Corps on the 18th of this month.

Hopefully I'll be starting in either Carpentry, or Pharmacy Technician. and than going into Nursing Assistant.

(Hopefully Pharmacy Technician Primary, with Nursing Assistant Secondary)

A&P I've been studying more extensively than I have with military texts. (For me, that actually says a great deal)

After Job Corps, going to try another round at Enlisting. If that don't work, Job Corps I'm going to has a college program. They'll pay for an entire Associates Degree. (I could get my ASN, get my NCLEX-RN, and turn around and get my NREMT-P, because ASN satisfies education requirements to take NREMT-P exam) If I have to go that route to get into the Army, I'll do it. Already been waiting 3 years to Enlist, only to have to wait another year anyways.

The coloring book I'll definitely be looking into before I leave. (This may sound gay, but I actually do color... Even at age 19.... But usually Pokemon :D:confused: LOL)

I'd enroll in an NREMT-B class, (community college is offering one in September) but as stated above, I'm leaving in 15 days. CNA and NREMT-B have a relatively same Scope of Practice (enough that after I get my CNA, I can take the NREMT-B test, if I get my LPN, I can take the NREMT-I test, RN can take my NREMT-P test, because Scope of Practice civilian side, they are each equivalent.)

Although I know military medicine is a whole-nother ball game. (JSOCMC may train towards the Paramedic Level, but a W1s skills are above a Paramedic, Because Paramedics civilian side can't do invasive surgical procedures, and I once had a W1 tell me how one time he ended up massaging a Ranger's heart, while his buddy went in to patch up wounds in the heart... That's WAY beyond a Paramedic, so I know even if I get my NREMT-P, I still have a great deal more to learn, and continue to learn, which if I went medical, that would be expected.)

I've got to go workout now. (accidentally slept in) I'll be dropping by the library after working out. Going to see what coloring books they've got for sale, and even what kind of sketch books they have. (how-to-sketch)

Any other suggestions are greatly welcome.

and Arizonaguide on

http://www.emt-national-training.com/intermediate-practice-tests.php

I scored 100% on the Cardiology test, Airway and Breathing test, and the EMS Operations. =) YAY FOR ME! =)
 

HoosierAnnie

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GMAN
I am not military but what I am is a health care professionial with more years in the trenches that you, boyo, have been alive. All that lingo slingin you're doing is the result of more hours than you should be sitting behind that pc screen of yours. STOP worrying about how do I treat this that or the other. If you are over 18 find out about that EMT class our esteemed sword weilding crusader mentioned. Concentrate any reading you do on the BASICS, crawl before you run attitude. If a mil career as a medic is really what you want, get off your arse and get fit enough to get through enlistment while you are boning up on said basics. Health care is a very fluid arena, and treatments can change with the blink of an eye. Remember, text books are considered to be about 5 yrs behind cutting edge. As an RN with masters level schooling, I would reem you over the coals if you came into a class of mine with your kinda attitude. Realize that what you are is a BEGINNER, suck it up and develop some humility.

That said, reviewing anatomy is a wonderful palce to start.
 

TLDR20

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Although I know military medicine is a whole-nother ball game. (JSOCMC may train towards the Paramedic Level, but a W1s skills are above a Paramedic, Because Paramedics civilian side can't do invasive surgical procedures, and I once had a W1 tell me how one time he ended up massaging a Ranger's heart, while his buddy went in to patch up wounds in the heart... That's WAY beyond a Paramedic, so I know even if I get my NREMT-P, I still have a great deal more to learn, and continue to learn, which if I went medical, that would be expected.)

Wow that is a truly amazing story. A 68W1 performing open heart surgery. I would have liked to have seen that
 

0699

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Don't you still need to lose like 100 lbs before you can enlist?

Maybe you should focus on that.
 

Doc_K

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Although I know military medicine is a whole-nother ball game. (JSOCMC may train towards the Paramedic Level, but a W1s skills are above a Paramedic, Because Paramedics civilian side can't do invasive surgical procedures, and I once had a W1 tell me how one time he ended up massaging a Ranger's heart, while his buddy went in to patch up wounds in the heart... That's WAY beyond a Paramedic, so I know even if I get my NREMT-P, I still have a great deal more to learn, and continue to learn, which if I went medical, that would be expected.)

Are you sure this was an actual, real life medic telling you this?

Did the person in question look anything like this?
alice-with-caterpillar-2.jpg

And did you happen to see/converse with him after consuming your best friend's popular, all natural brownies?

Also, I recommend seasons 1 & 2 of House.

Seriously, though. People far more knowledgeable and experienced than I have put in their :2c:. If you're serious about entering the world of "combat medicine," I suggest you start taking their advice and stop blathering on about your own conceptions of medical care and fairy-tale stories you heard from Sasquatch or whoever the hell told you that story. Leave your half-assed assumptions at the door and really listen like a good student should.
 

surgicalcric

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...Blah, blah, blah....

And just when I didnt think you could know less about a topic than physical fitness...

A CNA's scope of practice (if thats what you would like to call it) isnt even similar to that of an EMT-B nor can they challenge the NREMT test. The same is true for LPN's and EMT-I's. To take the Registry test, for any level of provider the candidate must have attended a course that meets the standards of the NR of EMT's...

For a number of years SOCM medics couldnt even sit for the NREMT-P test because of this, thankfully that has been sorted out.

Go do fucking flutterkicks...
 

HeloMedic1171

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GMAN
I am not military but what I am is a health care professionial with more years in the trenches that you, boyo, have been alive.

so listen to what she and the other have said. take what you've heard, thought, done, or read, and toss it. start with NREMT-B. Brady is a good publisher to go to. read that, do the practice tests and chapter summaries, and also get the accompanying workbook (there's usually one) and do it cover-to-cover as well. when you're done, re-read, and repeat. if you're serious about being a medic, that's where you should start because it's where everyone from the lowliest 91B/91W/68W to the most experienced 18D started. W1 is a great course, and it's very beneficial... but W1 won't make any fucking sense to you if you don't first have the 68W to put it behind. savvy?

Are you sure this was an actual, real life medic telling you this? Did the person in question look anything like this?

nope. wasn't me!

Leave your half-assed assumptions at the door and really listen like a good student should.

x2. and this isn't the first time you've been told this.

And just when I didnt think you could know less about a topic than physical fitness...

and just when I thought you knew better than to come here, of all places, and bring your BS..... do you know what a sponge is? do you know why they are so valuable? obviously not. your role at this stage should be two-fold. absorb everything you can possibly soak up, and be so quiet that we forget you are there - because you're LISTENING and READING more the TALKING and TYPING.

you'd better figure it out quickly.
 

Poetic_Mind

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To further this line of thought... sometimes volunteer EMS/Fire agencies will pay for your training. Some (not all) will require a certain amount of service to the agency in exchange (eg, the FD down the road from where I grew required that you remain with them for 6 months, and respond to a certain percentage of calls). Other EMS organizations had an understanding that you would put the training to use for them, but nothing binding you to it.*

I'm not highly familiar with the field, but that might be a good way to start with formal education and some hands on experience.:2c:

*just note that in my limited experience with them, this rarely extended past EMT-B...

Very true. Certain agencies have spaces open in classes paid by that certain department. At my school, University of Dayton, there is a Rescue Squad club that offers space for 20 individuals to take and EMT basic course free. In exchange for the free classes, the individual must dedicate 2 semesters of service with the Rescue Squad. I'm thinking of seizing this opportunity come Spring when the classes begin.

Just wanted to reinforce Totentanz's advice:)
 

x SF med

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G-man;
For the sake of brevity, I will not quote all of the conflicting and off-lane comments from above - but will make a few comments, ask a few questions...
1. Why in a medical thread are you referencing any non-medical FMs? they have no bearing on the discussion, at all.
2. Why are you not focusing on finishing HS and losing weight as you posted before? - those are goal one.
3. Why have you not looked into the local EMT courses/rescue squads for civilian medical training?
4. What is the focus of your post? Why are you talking about carpentry/pharmacy tech with the Job Corps - and then CNA as an assistant brain surgeon (in your case sturgeon is closer).
5. Don't believe every story you hear from 'medics' - especially if it involves external cardiac massage in a battle situation... that's pretty much a fish story, most people could figure that out on their own.
6. Are you on any kind of medication? is it an anti psychotropic / anti psychotic? Or, are you just having fun pissing people off?
7. Do your own research then ask questions, and yopu won't come across as a whiny, lazy, 'give me the answers' kind of kid.

STFU, study for HS, and do PT.
 
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