Cervical injections for severe migraine sufferers

8

8'Duece

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I've been a severe migrain sufferer for years after recieving major head trauma due to a severe automobile crash in 2000. The usual course of treatment for aborting a severe migraine can be anything from oral medications, intramuscular injections, IV therapy with meds etc. Migraine sufferers generally have severe pain, photophobia, nausea and vomiting and numbness in the upper cervical area to include the shoulders (sometimes, but not all)

I've experienced just about every method of treatment during ER visits and I have not responded well to injections such as Toradol, an anti-inflammatory medication that is used to relieve the inflammation of the blood vessels through out the brain. Some patients respond well to this medication, however the vast majority of migraine sufferers do not. I am one of those patients. Forget the oral medications. Nothing has worked for abortive treatment with these medications, unless you've got a headache not true migraine. Some medications for prophylactic treatment do work very well. These include Propanalol (Beta Blocker) and other oral medications sometimes for depression. Studies have shown that even an oral vitamin daily dose of B-2 has prophylactic effects. To which I have been prescribed both for daily use.

Tonight I had one of the most severe migrains I've ever had. I attempted to abort the migrain with Zomig and over the counter pain relievers to no avail. I was extremely photophobic and vomiting and dry heaving about twice an hour. I went to the ER and my BP was 135/108. Obviously pain raises the BP and is a sign to the nursing staff that pain is truely present. (if I where within normal limits it's possible that I'm a drug seeker per ER non-standard protocols)

In the past I was alway's given 2mg Dilaudid, 20-40mg of Phenagan and a second injection of Toradol. Doping the patient is common practice with this routine type of migraine. All ER docs and nurses are aware of drug seeking behaviors and I am not one of them so I've had this course of treatment many times by many doctors in the ER.

Tonight was different. I didn't want to be doped up. I've got too much to get accomplished this week and I can't stay in bed all morning and afternoon high as a kite on Dilaudid. Once the physician came into the room he asked "What works for you" I told him my past with narcotics and anti inflammatory injections but that I would rather give a non-narcotic approach to aborting this particular migraine.

He tells me of a rather new procedure called Cervical Injections. My first thought was that it would be much like a spinal tap but in the cervical region of the spine. :eek:

In short they injected something similar to Lidocaine into the lower cervical region of the back of the neck into the ganglia of the lower cranial nerves. Within about 7 minutes I was completley pain free and then was given an injection of Phenagan for the nausea.

Here is a great article about this treatment option. It may not work for everybody and you may have to stick with a narco approach to abortive relief of the pain, but it has worked for me and up typing and reading and able to drive myself without being under the influence of strong narcotics. It has a long lasting effect so unlike narcotic medications it has a longer half life to it's treatment. Many migraine sufferers go to sleep after narcotic injections/IV only to wake to a rebound of the migraine.

Just some good info for docs, and the like if you have migraine sufferers in the field and you need them on their feet and 100% alert. The medication used in both sides of the lower cervical region was Buvicaine.

HERE: http://www.neurologist-doctor.com/images/Mellick_Headache_injections.pdf
 
8

8'Duece

Guest
It's been 6 hours since the cervical injections and I'm still without pain.




Better than just "bump" :D
 

Diamondback 2/2

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I wish I could say the same about them... I just started my second group of injections, I was injected between the C1 & T1 this last time... Still not helping me :(

I am glad they are helping you bro!
 
8

8'Duece

Guest
I wish I could say the same about them... I just started my second group of injections, I was injected between the C1 & T1 this last time... Still not helping me :(

I am glad they are helping you bro!

Are you recieving these injections for migrains or back pain ??? It may an entirely different medication and process of injection sight.


Sorry to hear your treatments are not working for you. :(
 
W

WillBrink

Guest
I've been a severe migrain sufferer for years after recieving major head trauma due to a severe automobile crash in 2000. The usual course of treatment for aborting a severe migraine can be anything from oral medications, intramuscular injections, IV therapy with meds etc. Migraine sufferers generally have severe pain, photophobia, nausea and vomiting and numbness in the upper cervical area to include the shoulders (sometimes, but not all)

Not sure if this is useful info to you at this point, or you may have already tried it, etc, but have you used Topamax (topiramate)? It's an antiepileptic drug, but for unknown reasons, is very effective at preventing migrains in some people. Some studies show it also worked when taken at the onset of a migrain to stop it or make it less severe, but it appears it's being used as a daily preventative. Worked well for my GF, but her migrains are clearly not as serious as yours. Anyway, probably something you have already explored with your doc, but if not:

When Indicated for Migraine:

Since this is a relatively new way to use some of the newer neuronal stabilizers (anticonvulsants) such as Topamax® (topiramate) (As well as others like Neurotin® (gabapentin), Lamictal® (lamotrigine) and Gabatril® (tiagabine)) prophylactically for Migraine disease, the dosage will be directed by your physican. Having noted that we will post recommend clinical practice guidelines for use as soon as we get that information from the manufacturer, FDA or AHS. For now, data from a Phase III study recently completed offers excellent information.

At the Migraine Trust's 14th biennial International Research Symposium, noted Migraine specialist Dr. Stephen Silberstein noted:

* The best results were achieved at a dosage of 100 or 200 milligrams of topiramate per day, a lower dosage than that used to treat epilepsy.
* The most commonly experience side effects were nausea and tingling of the extremities.
* "What was amazing in this trial was the effect on weight. The patients who got topiramate lost, on average, 3.8 percent of their body weight."

During a recent interview with MAGNUM, Dr. Silberstein elaborated:

* "The key to success with Topamax is a very slow titration up to the therapeutic dose. Patients should begin taking only 15 mg, once a day, and taper up slowly from there, being sure to take it in a split dose."
* The effective dosages are lower than you might think. Many patients achieve good results at only 50 mg per day."

http://www.migraines.org/treatment/protpmax.htm

The researchers found that those who received either 100 or 200 mg of Topamax daily experienced an average 39 and 41 percent reduction in migraine frequency, respectively. As in previous studies, the number of people whose migraine frequency was cut in half or even better was substantially higher for those taking all doses of Topamax than those receiving a placebo:

http://bipolar.about.com/cs/topamax/a/0209_topmigrain.htm

On Aug. 11, the FDA approved a new indication for topiramate tablets and sprinkle capsules (Topamax, made by Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc.), allowing their use for migraine prophylaxis in adults.

The approval was based on results of clinical trials showing that daily use of topiramate at the recommended dose significantly decreased the number of monthly migraine attacks in about 50% of patients compared with placebo.

Topiramate was previously indicated as adjunctive therapy for adult and pediatric patients aged two to 16 years with partial onset seizures or primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and in patients aged two years and older having seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/487907

Good luck and I wish you well. :)
 

Diamondback 2/2

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Are you recieving these injections for migrains or back pain ??? It may an entirely different medication and process of injection sight.


Sorry to hear your treatments are not working for you. :(

Back pain and I am recieving a epidural & steroid mix in multi areas along my spine. A few of buddies have said good things about it, but not so much for me...

I am glad they got you fixed up...;)
 
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