Special Forces medical instructors train at UNC

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Great program, this benefits both sides. While on active duty, I generally would establish a solid contact with civilian providers. I would also moonlight if our case load was low, or lacking in subspecialties. The extra bucks were nice, but the real gain was learning from each other's practice. It was a win win for all.

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TLDR20

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The SFC in scrubs was my Surgery instructor. I think he was the most professional instructor I have ever had, extremely knowledgeable. He even wrote me a great recommendation to get into a pre-med program in at Western Carolina.
 

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The SFC in scrubs was my Surgery instructor. I think he was the most professional instructor I have ever had, extremely knowledgeable. He even wrote me a great recommendation to get into a pre-med program in at Western Carolina.

Every 18D I have ever seen has been exemplary in technical and people skills. It is the SA factor at play, patients were very complimentary about the 18D's. The civilian providers were also impressed. The providers that found any fault were generally weak in their own abilities. While seldom mentioned outside of formal medical education, there are three "A's" a doc should have. They are: Availability, Affordability, and Affability. Keep that in mind, and you will go far in your practice, IMHO.

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TLDR20

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Every 18D I have ever seen has been exemplary in technical and people skills. It is the SA factor at play, patients were very complimentary about the 18D's. The civilian providers were also impressed. The providers that found any fault were generally weak in their own abilities. While seldom mentioned outside of formal medical education, there are three "A's" a doc should have. They are: Availability, Affordability, and Affability. Keep that in mind, and you will go far in your practice, IMHO.

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Did you work at VCU or something?
 

TLDR20

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Army Nurses hated us in the ER... we were allowed to cut, sew and prescribe they weren't... the Docs usually would say "what did you do, how many sutures, what did you give them as they were signing the chart..."

I had a really hard time with a nurse on my second rotation at an Indian reservation in OK. First day she basically tries to get me to do her bitchwork(taking BP's, getting blood samples(which I don't mind doing, but was not the reason for me being there)) So at first I do it, then see old miss bitch sitting there doing nothing. Well that was that, so I stopped and made her do it all. She then refused to put in any of the orders I had put in(IV line, ECG, things of that sort) because she thought they weren't needed. Well now it is bordering on being bad for the patient. So the ER doc checked everything and I was in the right of course. She was told to do what I said, and the only thing he needed to sign off on was narcotic rx's and possible drug interaction stuff. She never stopped giving us a hard time. It is sad because to her that is her daily job, but for me and my partner it was only our second taste of ER medicine. We started going to a local city hospital later in the rotation and everything with those nurses was A-OK.

I have had army LPN's tell me that they are more qualified than me. Now I am not a med officer, but if they are letting LPN's conduct surgical airways, intubations, venous cutdowns, and outright surgery and anesthesia I should have been sent to that course, because I am sure it was filled with a lot more lookers than SFMS,
 

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Cback & Troll, It was some time ago but I did a lot of work with an ENT friend in California, in Lompoc. The local Anesthesia guru was a bit testy, not unlike the nurses mentioned, so I m mostly scrubbed in and held retractors, ran the bovie, etc. In Mississippi our case load was really low, & I would do a few cases at the two local hospitals, and some OB work out Starkville way. In the late 80,s did quite a bit at the local Gen. Hosp in Dover, De. That was a level 2 trauma place at the time and worked out pretty well.

Nurses are usually, predictably, the easiest to run afoul of, the weaker nurses I should say. The game plan is a passive aggressive response to turf they think they own. Just be the professional & hold the high ground, you own it and they don't like it much. For the most part though, nurses are pretty good folk. They have a lot of clinical experience and can make clinical rotations easier, don't sell them short wholesale.

Be well Gents!

Jim
 

TLDR20

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I never got in a pissing contest with a nurse, not good for the career or rep... I'd let the docs or Charge nurse take care of it - I was a working guest in their Clinic/ER.

Neither did I, I took it to the Doc as well. Not my place as a guest in the hospital. However we were warned of the nurse in my particular story and told ahead of time how to handle it. I did just that.
 
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