Cleaning/ Caring for Old Guns

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I've acquired my dad's old shotguns and rifles. Years of sitting in his closet without any maintenance have left them rusty and with a white discoloration on the stocks. (One is his dad's Ranger Model 31 which must be 70+ years old).

Obviously, CLP and a rag on the metal for starters. I'm guessing light brushing with a brass wire brush for the more troublesome areas?

Then we have the stocks, all are original. What's the best way to clean those and what should I put on them once cleaned?

Anywho, I have two 30-ish YO Ruger 10/22's, the Ranger 31, a Ruger No. 1 in .270 Winchester (they don't make this one anymore and it's a solid 40 years old), and an Ithaca Model 37 Featherweight which is at least 50-60 years old.

I have no intention of shooting the shotguns, but the 3 Rugers will probably see some range time once they are cleaned up.

Thoughts on what to do after CLP and a rag?

ETA: I've found about 2-3 billion links and videos, and go figure, they agree on almost nothing...hence this thread.
 
Alright, so, I'm late.

I acquired an M44 about ten years ago that was poorly maintained and damaged. The stock was broken at the wrist, and it looked rough, lots of dings in the stock and was complete with rusty patches here and there. I took the rifle apart, put some rem oil on the metal and got after the rust with a brass brush and tried to gently brush the rust away. Frankly, that didn't work well, and I mainly wound up chewing up the bluing. I ended up using Birchwood Casey Blue and Rust Remover and some 220--grit sandpaper which did well enough.

I didn't want to booger up the finish as I had no idea how to re-blue the metal and didn't really want to learn on the fly, but I ended up have to blue it in places. Used BC's Permablue for that, and it was a straightforward process.

Repaired the stock by drilling a couple of 1/2" hole into the wrist about two inches behind the leading edge of the break (where I figured the wood was strong enough to hold) and gluing in a couple of dowel rods. Stripped and sanded the stock. Refinished it using a stock refinishing kit also made by from Birchwood Casey.

The end results were good enough for me.

DSCN1510B.JPG

Kicks like a mule but still one of my better hole punchers. The flake powder used by the murderous communist hordes makes for a nice fireball every time I shoot it and my kids love it.
 
Alright, so, I'm late.

I acquired an M44 about ten years ago that was poorly maintained and damaged. The stock was broken at the wrist, and it looked rough, lots of dings in the stock and was complete with rusty patches here and there. I took the rifle apart, put some rem oil on the metal and got after the rust with a brass brush and tried to gently brush the rust away. Frankly, that didn't work well, and I mainly wound up chewing up the bluing. I ended up using Birchwood Casey Blue and Rust Remover and some 220--grit sandpaper which did well enough.

I didn't want to booger up the finish as I had no idea how to re-blue the metal and didn't really want to learn on the fly, but I ended up have to blue it in places. Used BC's Permablue for that, and it was a straightforward process.

Repaired the stock by drilling a couple of 1/2" hole into the wrist about two inches behind the leading edge of the break (where I figured the wood was strong enough to hold) and gluing in a couple of dowel rods. Stripped and sanded the stock. Refinished it using a stock refinishing kit also made by from Birchwood Casey.

The end results were good enough for me.

View attachment 43707

Kicks like a mule but still one of my better hole punchers. The flake powder used by the murderous communist hordes makes for a nice fireball every time I shoot it and my kids love it.

Neat rifle. Had one and wish I still did. Amazing what these milsurps bring now, wish I would've kept a few I've owned for awhile longer. Still have my Yugo SKS and plan to keep it because it's fun.
 
Neat rifle. Had one and wish I still did. Amazing what these milsurps bring now, wish I would've kept a few I've owned for awhile longer. Still have my Yugo SKS and plan to keep it because it's fun.

I love old military rifles. When I grew up my Dad and all his friends were WW2 vets...and I was fed a steady diet of stories, movies, TV shows about WW2. I have an M1 Garand and an M1 Carbine. My youngest son just bought a .303 Enfield Pattern 14 that's over a hundred years old and still shoots great.

I left my awesome M14 at Parris Island. Got some plastic thing at Infantry Training Regiment. :ROFLMAO:
 
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I love old military rifles

Milsurps are interesting to collect. I used to have several and the research was the coolest thing about them. Trying to figure out where the gun had been and its purpose was always very interesting. According to a gun historian, I had a German K98 that had been captured and stored in Czech, then later purchased by Israel. Pretty crazy thought.
 
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