I Challenge Ye! The F.A.S.T Test

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WillBrink

Guest
OK, not really a challenge per se, but I thought this would be something members could do and post their scores. It's a simple easy to set up easy to score test. The FAST (Fundamentals, Accuracy, & Speed Test) is a standardized test used by ToddG at pistol-training.com.* It's become popular with shooters. People like Ken Hackathorn are using it in their courses I have been told.

The F.A.S.T. test:

Range: 7 yards
Target: 3×5 card (head), 8″ plate (body)
Start position: weapon concealed or in duty condition with all holster retention devices active; shooter facing downrange in relaxed stance with arms down at sides
Rounds fired: 6

Drill begins from the holster, pistol loaded with exactly two rounds. On the buzzer:

1. draw
2. fire two rounds at the 3×5 box
3. perform a slidelock reload
4. fire four rounds at the 8″ circle

I have attached the official test you can print on 8.5×14 Legal-size paper. It can also be set up using a 8" paper pie plate and 3x5 card.

The only gear this test does require is a shot timer. Very much worth having in my view, and a must for competitive shooters. :2c:

My best time so far is 6.5

I have also added my own version. The guy next to you exchanges mags that contain the 4rnd for the 8" circle. He adds a dummy rnd to your mag some place random and hands it back. You insert mag into gun not knowing where the dummy rnd is. So, everyone will have a dud some place in the 4 rnds of the second segment of the test. Those who fail to tap vs just rack (not uncommon I have noticed...) lose 5 seconds and i expect the emergency "tap, rack, bang" drill to add no more then 1-1.5 seconds or less (!!!) to the time.

I hope some of you try it and post your scores here!

* = http://pistol-training.com/fastest
 

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D

dusty

Guest
OK, not really a challenge per se, but I thought this would be something members could do and post their scores. It's a simple easy to set up easy to score test. The FAST (Fundamentals, Accuracy, & Speed Test) is a standardized test used by ToddG at pistol-training.com.* It's become popular with shooters. People like Ken Hackathorn are using it in their courses I have been told.

The F.A.S.T. test:

Range: 7 yards
Target: 3×5 card (head), 8″ plate (body)
Start position: weapon concealed or in duty condition with all holster retention devices active; shooter facing downrange in relaxed stance with arms down at sides
Rounds fired: 6

Drill begins from the holster, pistol loaded with exactly two rounds. On the buzzer:

1. draw
2. fire two rounds at the 3×5 box
3. perform a slidelock reload
4. fire four rounds at the 8″ circle

I have attached the official test you can print on 8.5×14 Legal-size paper. It can also be set up using a 8" paper pie plate and 3x5 card.

The only gear this test does require is a shot timer. Very much worth having in my view, and a must for competitive shooters. :2c:

My best time so far is 6.5

I have also added my own version. The guy next to you exchanges mags that contain the 4rnd for the 8" circle. He adds a dummy rnd to your mag some place random and hands it back. You insert mag into gun not knowing where the dummy rnd is. So, everyone will have a dud some place in the 4 rnds of the second segment of the test. Those who fail to tap vs just rack (not uncommon I have noticed...) lose 5 seconds and i expect the emergency "tap, rack, bang" drill to add no more then 1-1.5 seconds or less (!!!) to the time.

I hope some of you try it and post your scores here!

* = http://pistol-training.com/fastest


Dusty: 2.4 (blindfolded, standing on head, in a sandstorm, drunk):D
 
A

arizonaguide

Guest
Great drill, Will!
I Can't wait to get a chance to try this (ie: with both the revolver, AND then the 1911...and compare times between them). I'm still having a hard time completely letting go of the revolver, and putting 100% effort into the 1911. ;) Should be interesting!
:cool:
 
D

dusty

Guest
Great drill, Will!
I Can't wait to get a chance to try this (ie: with both the revolver, AND then the 1911...and compare times between them). I'm still having a hard time completely letting go of the revolver, and putting 100% effort into the 1911. ;) Should be interesting!
:cool:


Put that little smitty in your backup holster, bro-you may need it someday. Those 1911 mainsprings are finicky at the worst of times, believe me!!!

Or ask Will :D
 
W

WillBrink

Guest
Put that little smitty in your backup holster, bro-you may need it someday. Those 1911 mainsprings are finicky at the worst of times, believe me!!!

Or ask Will :D

That reminds me: took my CCW gun to the range this morning as it has not been shot in a long time and stays cocked and locked 24/7. Worked fine, but I think it's time for some new springs. Probably mainspring, sear spring, etc.
 
A

arizonaguide

Guest
Put that little smitty in your backup holster, bro-you may need it someday. Those 1911 mainsprings are finicky at the worst of times, believe me!!!

Or ask Will :D
YUP! the revolver is still the primary weapon, until I get more training (muscle memory) with the 1911. Ammo being the biggest problem right now. But, I like Will's training idea, and that might be a good start (and lotsa "dry fire" practice) until the next class. Thanks Will!
:2c:
 
W

WillBrink

Guest
YUP! the revolver is still the primary weapon, until I get more training (muscle memory) with the 1911. Ammo being the biggest problem right now. But, I like Will's training idea, and that might be a good start (and lotsa "dry fire" practice) until the next class. Thanks Will!
:2c:

I don't know if it's training as much as testing, but it gives you a good objective yard stick to see where you are at. It's easy to set up, score, and is good practice at least.
 
A

arizonaguide

Guest
YUP! Good stuff Will. Thanks Bro! :cool: It'll sure help. I need to get a timer anyway!
 
D

dusty

Guest
That reminds me: took my CCW gun to the range this morning as it has not been shot in a long time and stays cocked and locked 24/7. Worked fine, but I think it's time for some new springs. Probably mainspring, sear spring, etc.


Will-ol' man know all here, again-son, you need to empty your mags and cycle your gun at least once a week, or the springs will develop muscle memory. Almost any spring will, but helical compressed are the worst.:2c:
 
W

WillBrink

Guest
Will-ol' man know all here, again-son, you need to empty your mags and cycle your gun at least once a week, or the springs will develop muscle memory. Almost any spring will, but helical compressed are the worst.:2c:

I do that, not exactly once per week, but I do it. Gun ran 100% for 100rnds as a quick test, but that's the first time that particular gun has been shot in a long time. Figured a total spring change couldn't hurt, now that I am an expert smith! :doh:
 

P. Beck

Special Forces
Verified SOF
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
197
Location
Mistake not grace for mercy.
Here's a drill I use to separate the "gunfighters" (those who take the art seriously enough to practice on their own) from the "70%'ers" (those who think that quarterly quals were good enough). It's quick and only takes 2-3 rounds per shooter, per iteration.

You can do this one with a PACT timer but it is intended to be a man-on-man event.

You can vary the conditions but the basics are this:

Two shooters on the firing line at a time (you can vary the range, 7, 10, 15 yards, depending on conditions, shooter proficiency and target size). Weapon in the holster, all security devices engaged. One round in the chamber, empty magazine in the magazine well. Two magazines, one round in each, in pouches, also secured if the pouch is so designed.

Two pepper poppers (or plates) for each shooter, a couple meters apart.

Shooters start with their backs to the targets. This is important. In too many drills the shooter begins facing the target and has the opportunity to set up his stance "just so". He can also identify his target and gain "target focus". Turning takes all that away.

On the command, shooters will turn, draw and engage the first target with one round, execute a reload and either a) re-engage the first plate (if they missed) or, b) engage the second plate. If he misses with the second round, he can execute a second reload and re-engage. Quickest two plates down. The winner of each engagement should be self-evident to everyone and moves on to the next round.

It covers all the basics. The shooter has to hit his stance, grip, draw stroke, sight picture, trigger stroke, reload, trigger, to the best of his ability, all while another shooter right next to him is trying to do exactly the same thing.

Double elimination means the overall best shooter has to be consistent as well and can't win just because he had one good run. Like-wise, a guy who just has a bad first run is still in the running.

You can vary the conditions, distance, targets (pepper poppers: plate on the bottom wins), target separation, etc. but, in my opinion, the most important part is the man-on-man aspect. It lets you know exactly where you stand.

Another variation I throw in is, if we're working on transitions, have the shooters begin facing away from the target, and, on command, turn, attempt to engage with their primary, dropping the hammer on an empty chamber, simulating a failure. Then transition to their sidearm and engage as above.

What do the onlookers do? Why, stand nearby and question the shooters manhood, parentage, intelligence, judgment, sexual orientation, taste in clothing, etc. in loud and derisive tones and terms, obviously.

Season to taste and enjoy.

PS If you don't have any steel plates, here's a tip: railroad footer plates work great. If you walk along the tracks enough, you will eventually find a couple discarded footer plates. They are steel, about the right size and, apparently, impervious to pistol fire. I have not tried them with rifle rounds.
Anyway, pick 'em up, spray-paint them white, hang the little lip on the back on a tomato stake and you're in business.
 

CBTech

SOF Support
Joined
Jun 15, 2008
Messages
176
I like the ones where you run your ass off and get your heart rate way up and then shoot.

I will try Will's test. Sounds pretty neat. One I also like is trying to hit dip can tins at 50 yards with a Kimber Custom Shop. Me and an Uncle of mine have this competition with his 1911. Kentucky windage with a pistol, gotta love it.
 
D

dusty

Guest
Here's a drill I use to separate the "gunfighters" (those who take the art seriously enough to practice on their own) from the "70%'ers" (those who think that quarterly quals were good enough). It's quick and only takes 2-3 rounds per shooter, per iteration.

You can do this one with a PACT timer but it is intended to be a man-on-man event.

You can vary the conditions but the basics are this:

Two shooters on the firing line at a time (you can vary the range, 7, 10, 15 yards, depending on conditions, shooter proficiency and target size). Weapon in the holster, all security devices engaged. One round in the chamber, empty magazine in the magazine well. Two magazines, one round in each, in pouches, also secured if the pouch is so designed.

Two pepper poppers (or plates) for each shooter, a couple meters apart.

Shooters start with their backs to the targets. This is important. In too many drills the shooter begins facing the target and has the opportunity to set up his stance "just so". He can also identify his target and gain "target focus". Turning takes all that away.

On the command, shooters will turn, draw and engage the first target with one round, execute a reload and either a) re-engage the first plate (if they missed) or, b) engage the second plate. If he misses with the second round, he can execute a second reload and re-engage. Quickest two plates down. The winner of each engagement should be self-evident to everyone and moves on to the next round.

It covers all the basics. The shooter has to hit his stance, grip, draw stroke, sight picture, trigger stroke, reload, trigger, to the best of his ability, all while another shooter right next to him is trying to do exactly the same thing.

Double elimination means the overall best shooter has to be consistent as well and can't win just because he had one good run. Like-wise, a guy who just has a bad first run is still in the running.

You can vary the conditions, distance, targets (pepper poppers: plate on the bottom wins), target separation, etc. but, in my opinion, the most important part is the man-on-man aspect. It lets you know exactly where you stand.

Another variation I throw in is, if we're working on transitions, have the shooters begin facing away from the target, and, on command, turn, attempt to engage with their primary, dropping the hammer on an empty chamber, simulating a failure. Then transition to their sidearm and engage as above.

What do the onlookers do? Why, stand nearby and question the shooters manhood, parentage, intelligence, judgment, sexual orientation, taste in clothing, etc. in loud and derisive tones and terms, obviously.

Season to taste and enjoy.

PS If you don't have any steel plates, here's a tip: railroad footer plates work great. If you walk along the tracks enough, you will eventually find a couple discarded footer plates. They are steel, about the right size and, apparently, impervious to pistol fire. I have not tried them with rifle rounds.
Anyway, pick 'em up, spray-paint them white, hang the little lip on the back on a tomato stake and you're in business.


Me likee.
 
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