Question about joining MARSOC

LCwrestling

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I am thinking about joining MARSOC, but first I am going to go to college. After college i dont mind going enlisted or officer, but if i did not become a ground officer for some reason i would not be able to join MARSOC, so what should i do?
 

ritterk

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You need to do some research on this before asking questions about joining MARSOC. First off I'm not in MARSOC, but as far as I know they are taking officers from any MOS as long as your monitor will release you, which can be difficult depending on the need of the Marine Corps. There has been a lot of discussion on this topic already, read through the threads and try to post a question that hasn't already been addressed. Don't start with the typical "I want to be a killer I kick ass at sports, run 200 miles per week, work out 7 times a day, and other crap like that. Look into the Marine Corps reserves, I'm assuming that you are not in the Marine Corps so for all you know you could completely hate being a Marine, yes it does happen. So to answer your "what should I do," question: Join the reserves (so you can do college at the same time), make it through boot camp, complete the School of Infantry and decide if you really want to invest a lot of time and effort into joining MARSOC, because it is not an easy task.
 

cbiwv

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I love how guys who aren't even in service think they can come right in and assume they are Special Ops material.
 

LCwrestling

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I haven't assumed that I am spec ops material, it is something that i hope to do. I'm sorry if that came out wrong.
 

cbiwv

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There are plenty of guys who do not make it through Marine Corps boot camp. Maybe you should do that first.
 

AMRUSMCR

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I cannot speak about the path to MARSOC but I wanted to provide input that I think RitterK brought up a good avenue.

The Marine Corps does have a commissioning program in the reserves. You split up the training over the summers and go through both sides of the house (enlisted and officer). I'm not sure how it works on the O side if you pursue/accept a commission at the completion of college, but these are questions you could take to a recruiter if it's something you're interested in looking further into.
 
7

7point62

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Ask a recruiter but think about this: if you are going to put in the effort for a 4-year degree, then aim to become an officer.
 

Voodoo

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c'mon guys, stop ball busting...He has a goal....that is good. With those goals you need obviously "short term" and "long term". IMO short term should be first get through boot. I am not a Marine but I was a Squiddy and their boot was cake....clarify was, not sure how it is now that was in '85 but anyhow. Ritter has a good idea by doing reserves while finishing College that way you will do 2 things...1. Finish School and 2. Go through and possibly finish boot. There are your short term goals finished. Afther that I would assume getting your MOS, learning the Marine way and talking to your CO about MARSOC....it is good to let them know your goals and aspirations that way they can guide you if they think you are MARSOC material...even if they dont its not a bad thing to let them know. Besides I would again Assume that you need their signoff to do this, since they know and if you have properly addressed all of your MOS basics, ran circles around the other guys, then you might get into MARSOC. I hope this helps.
 

pardus

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Kid, do a lot of reading both here on SS and elsewhere, there is a ton of info here about MARSOC etc...

If you do research and still have questions that you can't find answers to we will help if we can.

Don't expect us to do your work for you though.

Good luck with it all.

Good plan about getting a degree first. :2c:
 

cbiwv

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My cousin was Force Recon so I know how tough it is. It is no joke and you have to be a special kind of man to be Special Ops.
 

lockNload

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The Marine Corps does have a commissioning program in the reserves. You split up the training over the summers and go through both sides of the house (enlisted and officer). I'm not sure how it works on the O side if you pursue/accept a commission at the completion of college, but these are questions you could take to a recruiter if it's something you're interested in looking further into.

Not sure if you are talking about PLC? If so, you don't have to be in the Reserves for that program. Any college student can apply and complete OCS during the summer. I knew a few guys that were Reservists that were also in PLC so I don't know if that's what you are thinking of?

Decide what you really want to do. Do you want to always be in the field, doing high speed shit and being a trigger puller? If the answer is yes then enlist. Do you really want to lead Marines, have a lot of responsibilities, roll the dice on what MOS you get and the needs of the Corps? Then see an OSO and explore becoming an officer. The NCO's run the platoon and are hands on and deal with their Marines on a more personal level and deal with discipline issues. As an officer you will be responsible with more big picture issues as they pertain to your platoon and handling logistics for your Marines. This doesn't mean you wont be in the field and doing some cool stuff as an officer, just that the jobs are very different and you need to decide which is more important to you.

Marine boot is tasked with training a basic Marine. OCS has the mission of screening candidates to see who has what it takes to be a leader of Marines. All the skills training comes later at TBS. You can blend in and try to be the gray man in basic. That's a little harder to do at OCS and you need to realize that you could be put in a leadership billet the first week there before you feel like you know anything.
 

lockNload

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Ask a recruiter but think about this: if you are going to put in the effort for a 4-year degree, then aim to become an officer.

I disagree with this line of thinking. Just because someone has a degree that doesn't mean they have the leadership ability to become an officer. That doesn't mean they would be best utilized as an officer or enjoy it as much as being enlisted. Just like running one's own business isn't for everyone, same applies here. Not everyone thrives on being given a lot of responsibility and the life that is an officer. There were several valid reasons why I decided to pursue OCS, I actually enjoy having responsibilities and believed my character and leadership abilities would benefit the Corps. However, there were a couple that don't seem as valid that I think other college grads might be considering and that is this: I was 24 years old and wanted to make some decent money and have my own living quarters. I had already shared a room in a fraternity house and dorms and didn't want to continue doing so. Just explore both options thoroughly, examine what YOU truly want out of the military experience, and do some real soul searching. Good luck.
 

Totentanz

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I disagree with this line of thinking. Just because someone has a degree that doesn't mean they have the leadership ability to become an officer. That doesn't mean they would be best utilized as an officer or enjoy it as much as being enlisted. Just like running one's own business isn't for everyone, same applies here. Not everyone thrives on being given a lot of responsibility and the life that is an officer. There were several valid reasons why I decided to pursue OCS, I actually enjoy having responsibilities and believed my character and leadership abilities would benefit the Corps. However, there were a couple that don't seem as valid that I think other college grads might be considering and that is this: I was 24 years old and wanted to make some decent money and have my own living quarters. I had already shared a room in a fraternity house and dorms and didn't want to continue doing so. Just explore both options thoroughly, examine what YOU truly want out of the military experience, and do some real soul searching. Good luck.

I agree with this 100%. If serving on the "dark side" (as an officer) is the job that you want to do, go for OCS. But don't push enlisting off the table just because OCS is an option. :2c:
 

AMRUSMCR

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Not sure if you are talking about PLC? If so, you don't have to be in the Reserves for that program. Any college student can apply and complete OCS during the summer. I knew a few guys that were Reservists that were also in PLC so I don't know if that's what you are thinking of?

That's exactly what I was thinking of. http://www.marineofficerprograms.com/pages/platoon-leaders-class-plc.php

The PLC Program has both ground and aviation options and is open to college freshmen, sophomores and juniors. Freshman and sophomores take their pre-commissioning training at Quantico, Virginia in two separate six-week training sessions over two summers without interrupting their academic career. One session takes place at the end of the first year following acceptance into the program and the other session is conducted at the end of the junior year of college. College juniors accepted into the PLC Program attend 10 weeks of training after the end of their junior year. After completion of all training requirements and upon receipt of degree, candidates are commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. Immediately thereafter, assignment to active duty commences.

The mission of OCS is to provide a physically challenging and mentally stressful training environment in which candidates can be evaluated on their leadership ability and potential to serve as United States Marine Corps Officers. Officer Candidate School may well be the most demanding challenge you ever faced.

Upon completion of Officer Candidate School (OCS) and graduation from a four-year college, you'll be offered a commission as a Marine Officer. If you choose to accept this 'job offer' you will serve on active duty in the Marine Corps for three and a half years (more if you choose). Your commission is the beginning of a career (whether you serve 4 years or 20+ years) with many opportunities for advancement and a broad array of exciting jobs.
 
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