Question for all you EMT/EMTS/EMTP types...

C

cb88

Guest
How "easy" is it to "drop" someone once you have them on a gurny? Do you have to be fairly careless and not paying attention, or is this a more common occurrence?

The reason I ask is one of the insurance programs I underwrite is for ambulance companies...I am renewing a policy right now and reviewing losses and they have a very large loss because they dropped the gurny and the patient is claiming it worsened his/her injuries. I understand that could be true -- back injury or neck injury, another jolt and "bam" they are paralyzed.

I'm just wondering if there are some best practices or better training they can partake in to avoid this kind of loss in the future or if this was just dumb luck a bad accident that "happens"....I don't see losses from this as a general rule so from my perspective, it's not occuring that much (though that could be a warped perspective, maybe others aren't so sue happy or didn't get hurt).
 

JustAnotherJ

Pararescue
Verified SOF
Joined
Aug 7, 2007
Messages
436
SSMP
SOF Mentor
i personally didn't spent much time as a street medic, however to drop a gurney is a pretty big no-no. Considering the gurney has 4 wheels and is pretty stable, it doesn't happen all that often...dropping a backboard however could happen more just because it depends on strength and grip. Also, however, people can occasionally raise the gurney but somehow it doesn't lock so then it drops. I hope this helps.
 
C

cb88

Guest
Yes, it does.

I understand, to your last scenario, there is a new hydraulic gurney that would prevent this type of thing from happening? Perhaps I should adjust my application to see if they are using those -- if so, perhaps a credit/discount is warranted? Do you know anything about the hydraulic gurneys?
 

Totentanz

Civil Affairs
Verified SOF
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
1,614
Yes, it does.

I understand, to your last scenario, there is a new hydraulic gurney that would prevent this type of thing from happening? Perhaps I should adjust my application to see if they are using those -- if so, perhaps a credit/discount is warranted? Do you know anything about the hydraulic gurneys?

Our local ambulance unit recently switched over to motorized units. I really don't know much more than that (with regards to the equipment involved), but I can try to find out...
 

JustAnotherJ

Pararescue
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Joined
Aug 7, 2007
Messages
436
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SOF Mentor
i would credit them if they have the mechanical (motorized units that raise and lower the gurny...i think they can lift patients up to 600 lbs however i may be off) ones. I know that in Albuquerque, NM, the Albuquerque Ambulance Service uses them...they decrease strain on weak-gened lazy workers and decrease the frequency of drops.
 
D

DDSSDV

Guest
Simple answer...shit happens. Never done that but have other silly shit NONE intentional.
 
J

jelco90

Guest
Im experienced with "self lifting/motorized" stretchers. They only solve one problem. Lifting the patient up or down. EMS providers still have to negotiate through difficult terrain/buildings/stairs/steps/ramps/etc whether thay are using the good old Ferno or the new "wonder" Stryker automatic lift.

EMS in general is amuck with fat ass, out of shape people. The problem should be solved by enforcing fitness for the job...Unpopular as it is.
Jelco
 

medic1

Unverified
Joined
Sep 18, 2007
Messages
37
Location
Perth, WA
drop the cot

yea, the use of the Ferno cot [and those like it] is tricky when you are extracting from scene. Most vans carry the bog standard manual lift/ drop cot and if the patient is obese, moving or the cot needs repair then it has been known for the ratchet device to drop and thus the patient will take the fast route down........if they had spinal injury/ head injury/ fracture then it would make it worse!!
hope that sheds sme light on the matter!
Medic1:D
 
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