Handgun Standard Exercise: Hackathorn Standards

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WillBrink

Guest
If you want something new to really test your skills, the Hackathorn Standards. Have not done it myself yet, but come spring where I have access to an open outdoor range, I plan to.

Source: Larry Vickers (former CAG Lead Firearms Instructor)



Handgun Standard Exercise: Hackathorn Standards
Course Designer: Ken Hackathorn


300 Points 60 Rounds No Make Up Shots
IPSC Target:
A = 5 C = 3 D = 2 Entire Head = 5
All stages start holstered unless otherwise noted.
250+ Expert
200-249 Acceptable
Below 200 Needs Improvement

Notes:
Originally designed for IPSC targets; IDPA target are slightly more difficult (smaller 5 zone).
Highest Score Ever: Larry Vickers 298
Highest First Time Score: Rob Leatham 290
Jerry Barnhart's First Time Score: 277

Targets: 3 IPSC, 1m spacing, staggered medium-high-low height

#1--5 yards--1 rd on each head from draw freestyle--3 sec
#2--5 yards--1 rd on each head strong hand--4 sec
#3--5 yards--1 rd on each body strong hand--3 sec
#4--5 yards--1 rd on each body strong hand--3 sec
#5--8 yards--2 rds on left target freestyle--2 sec
#6--8 yards--2 rds on center target freestyle--2 sec
#7--8 yards--2 rds on right target freestyle--2 sec
#8--10 yards--El Presidente; start facing uprange w/6 rds in gun, turn and draw, 2 rds each target, slide lock reload, 2 rds on each target--10 seconds
#9--10 yards--weak hand pickup; gun on ground, butt to strong side, start standing, strong hand in small of back, retrieve handgun, 1 rd on each target--5 sec
#10--12 to 8 yards--2 rds each target while moving forward from 12 yds--5 sec
#11--15 yards--transition drill; start with hands at shoulder level as if holding rifle, 1 rd on each target--4 sec
#12--20 yards--start standing; drop to prone, 2 rds on each target--10 sec
#13--25 yards--start behind barricade; 2 rds on each target standing, perform tactical reload under cover(retain/stow partial mag), 2 rds on each target kneeling--24 sec
 

FireWatch

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Sounds like a decent course of fire. I think I will run the boys through at the next SWAT training. Are you giving a penalty if they go over the time limit? Or just assume they will stop firing when the buzzer sounds after the alotted time.
 
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WillBrink

Guest
Sounds like a decent course of fire. I think I will run the boys through at the next SWAT training. Are you giving a penalty if they go over the time limit? Or just assume they will stop firing when the buzzer sounds after the alotted time.

Not sure honestly. I had the same question and a few others I have to dig up the answers to. Will post the info when I get it.
 
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08steeda

Guest
We ran this same kind of drill and had to stop shooting at the buzzer. Best I ever did was 269 I think. I remember because I always wanted to get over 270 and never did! But that was over 12 years ago. I have my scores somewhere! It was very nerve racking!!!! Got the blood flowing for sure!
 
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WillBrink

Guest
We ran this same kind of drill and had to stop shooting at the buzzer. Best I ever did was 269 I think. I remember because I always wanted to get over 270 and never did! But that was over 12 years ago. I have my scores somewhere! It was very nerve racking!!!! Got the blood flowing for sure!

I was told the IDPA classifier is based on this test. I have not done the above, but I have done IDPA classifiers and they are tough. It's the distance stuff that kills my scores. What keeps me from going up a level in IDPA is the distance stuff at 25 yards. I just don't practice those distances much, but I have gotten better this year, so I hope this spring when the classifiers start up, I can move up a level, where I will get my a$$ kicked. If you have not shot IDPA, if you liked the above, you will like IDPA.
 
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08steeda

Guest
Never shot IDPA just IPSC. Plus the normal 3 gun combat shoots. But we did the above mentioned drill or one very close to it as often as we could. This was a combined effort with DEA, FBI, Federal Marshals, State and Local SWAT teams.

I used to be a Qualified IPSC Instructor.

Will - Get yourself some snap caps and practice sight picture and trigger pull - EVERY DAY. This will improve your skills in the longer range shooting. The stronger your muscles are (The shooting specific muscles required for shooting) the smaller the groups. Smaller Groups equal better range, although sticking to one weapon and caliber and shooting at greater ranges is the best practice. Just make sure it is not fruitless practice.

This is all about fine motor skills along with big muscle memory!!!

Try this:

Load several mags and put a snap cap randomly thru the multiple mags. Then mix them up. If you are anticipating the shot then when you land and fire on a snap cap during live fire you will see the front site jump! This is very common even for expert shooters. Just figuring out if you are doing this almost corrects itself. But you gotta see it for yourself to believe it.

I have seen some real studs call BS on this drill. But then I have slipped a snap cap in their mag when they aren't looking and the reaction is like ..... HOLYSHIT! I can't believe it jumped! Makes a believer out of anyone!!!

If you are anticipating your shot then your 25m scores will go way down.

It is funny to do this to someone unaware and watch their reaction!!! Good fun!!! But it shows the most common flaw for shooters in vivid detail!

---CLICK ----JUMP --- WTF!!!! Uproarious laughter from those observing!!!
 

Diamondback 2/2

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What keeps me from going up a level in IDPA is the distance stuff at 25 yards. I just don't practice those distances much, but I have gotten better this year, so I hope this spring when the classifiers start up, I can move up a level, where I will get my a$$ kicked.


Use some dummy rounds mixed in with your live rounds, if you see anticipation when you hit a dummy. Stop and hammer cock and dryfire until you get 5 consecutive dry shots with no movement. Then eject the dummy and go continue to fire.

Dryfire 100 times a day, do it against a wall (white) and make sure you have zero movement in your sights. If you find movement adjust your trigger finger or grip until the movement is gone.

Start your range day with two strings of slow fire at 25 yards (10 rounds in 10 minutes) take your time on each shot and practice calling your shot. Use the clock method (low at 7 o clock) the drill helps you focus on where your sights are and what your sights do as you break the shot. After you fire your normal range stuff, fire two more slow fire strings. This will show you how bad your fundamentals get when you are firing all the rapid fire and point shoot stuff.

Focus on the basic fundamentals, put all the other bullshit out of your mind and do a mental check of your fundamentals prior to shooting the course of fire.

Sight aligned on the target area.
Pressure on the trigger with out moving the sights.
Maintain pressure on the trigger and following through with the shot.
Reset the trigger and repeat.

And the best thing you can do, is maintain a positive attitude and thoughts on shooting out side of your comfort zone. Never focus on the bad shots and what you did wrong, focus on every good shot and what you did to achieve that good shot…

Buy a 22 caliber conversion kit and practice sights and trigger at 25 to 50 yards. Perfect your fundamentals so that you know what it takes to make that perfect shot. I shoot white paper plates, they are cheap and allow you to maintain focus on the sights…

Top center of the front sight, top center of the front sight, TOP CENTER OF THE FRONT SIGHT! ;)
 
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WillBrink

Guest
Use some dummy rounds mixed in with your live rounds, if you see anticipation when you hit a dummy.

I have for some time. I have been working that system and others long enough where anticipation does not appear to be a major issue for me. Everyone can do it once in a while, but that's one ghost that does not appear to be an ongoing issue for me. On the long distance stuff, I think it's trigger control issues. Good trigger control is a must on 1911s and exposes itself at longer distances. Working with some other good trainers and such (Jeff G, etc) they felt my stance, grip, presentation, etc was all good. Trigger control seems to be that thing that vexes everyone. I have noticed large improvements in the distance shooting this year, in both IDPA and at the range, in courses, so things are paying off there, slow as it is!

Pressure on the trigger with out moving the sights.
Maintain pressure on the trigger and following through with the shot.
Reset the trigger and repeat.

The above is the area I believe still gives me issues as mentioned. It's what I try to focus on, and it is helping.

Thanx for the advice JAB. All good stuff to keep in mind for my next range day. I also need to join a different club. The one I am at now is very limiting. There are a few that are a longer drive, but probably worth it at this point.
 
D

dusty

Guest
Use some dummy rounds mixed in with your live rounds, if you see anticipation when you hit a dummy. Stop and hammer cock and dryfire until you get 5 consecutive dry shots with no movement. Then eject the dummy and go continue to fire.

Dryfire 100 times a day, do it against a wall (white) and make sure you have zero movement in your sights. If you find movement adjust your trigger finger or grip until the movement is gone.

Start your range day with two strings of slow fire at 25 yards (10 rounds in 10 minutes) take your time on each shot and practice calling your shot. Use the clock method (low at 7 o clock) the drill helps you focus on where your sights are and what your sights do as you break the shot. After you fire your normal range stuff, fire two more slow fire strings. This will show you how bad your fundamentals get when you are firing all the rapid fire and point shoot stuff.

Focus on the basic fundamentals, put all the other bullshit out of your mind and do a mental check of your fundamentals prior to shooting the course of fire.

Sight aligned on the target area.
Pressure on the trigger with out moving the sights.
Maintain pressure on the trigger and following through with the shot.
Reset the trigger and repeat.

And the best thing you can do, is maintain a positive attitude and thoughts on shooting out side of your comfort zone. Never focus on the bad shots and what you did wrong, focus on every good shot and what you did to achieve that good shot…

Buy a 22 caliber conversion kit and practice sights and trigger at 25 to 50 yards. Perfect your fundamentals so that you know what it takes to make that perfect shot. I shoot white paper plates, they are cheap and allow you to maintain focus on the sights…

Top center of the front sight, top center of the front sight, TOP CENTER OF THE FRONT SIGHT! ;)

Outstanding post!
 
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