Ranger to receive Silver Star

Ravage

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http://news.soc.mil/releases/News Archive/2008/October/081016-01.html

FORT BENNING, Ga. (USASOC News Service, Oct. 16, 2008)—A 75th Ranger Regiment Soldier will be awarded a Silver Star medal during a ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at Infantry Hall, here.

Sgt. 1st Class Ray A. Plasterer is being awarded the Silver Star medal for gallantry in action during combat operations against an armed enemy of the United States as an assistant team sergeant for a joint task force in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. After Plasterer’s patrol came under ambush from two positions, he moved under heavy enemy fire through an open area and into the kill zone to reach his vehicle to radio for immediate close air support and medical evacuation of wounded personnel. Seeing his radio was inoperable and that he was pinned down in the vehicle, he drove it in reverse back to his men until the truck was disabled. He again braved intense small arms fire to link up with his squad and passed critical information to the ground force commander. His tactical decision making put his unit into a position which allowed them to engage the enemy with deadly precision, maintain fire superiority, and allow the remainder of the force to enter the large building and destroy the last of the enemy combatants. Throughout the two hour fight, his courage and heroism saved numerous lives and led to a decisive victory and the death of 22 enemy combatants.

Plasterer, 29 serves with Regimental Special Troops Battalion, 75th Rgr. Regmt., and has been a Ranger for nine years. He has deployed nine times in support of the war on terrorism.

The Silver Star is the Army’s third highest award for combat valor and is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States during military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force.

Lt. Gen. Robert W. Wagner, commander of U.S. Army Special Operations Command at Fort Bragg, N.C., will preside over the ceremony and present the awards.
Reporters interested in covering the ceremony must register with the 75th Ranger Regiment PAO, Tracy Bailey, by 11 a.m. Oct. 17. Please call 706-545-4260 or e-mail tracy.a.bailey@us.army.mil. Please provide the number of news team members, video/still photographers, live trucks (including live hit times) and other special equipment you plan to bring to the ceremony. Special needs or interview requests should be submitted at this time as well. Also, provide after-hours contact information, including e-mail address, so we may keep you advised of any changes to the program schedule.

SFC Plasterer will be available for interviews following the ceremony for media who have properly coordinated with the 75th Ranger Regiment PAO.
 

Centermass

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Ranger "Plasterer"

Sure lived up to his name when taking out the trash.

Outstanding is an understatement.

Fuckin A - RLTW :cool:
 

JBS

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Throughout the two hour fight, his courage and heroism saved numerous lives and led to a decisive victory and the death of 22 enemy combatants.
Badassery!
 
0

08steeda

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Good guy to have on your side in a fight!!!

Way to go Ranger!!! Well deserved!!!
 

Ravage

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http://news.soc.mil/releases/News Archive/2008/October/081022-01.html

Ranger awarded Silver Star for heroic actions in Afghanistan

FORT BENNING, Ga. (USASOC News Service, Oct. 22, 2008) – What started as a multiple-day desert terrain presence patrol covering hundreds of miles in Southern Afghanistan turned into a surprise ambush by enemy forces for members of the 75th Ranger Regiment.

Sgt. 1st Class Ray Plasterer, a reconnaissance assistant team sergeant with Regimental Special Troops Battalion, 75th Ranger Regt., and his team were conducting a routine presence patrol in a rural area of Afghanistan in May 2008 when they were caught in a surprise attack initiated by rocket propelled grenades, small arms fire and fragmentary grenades.

Five friendly forces were wounded and four were killed in the firefight. However, Plasterer’s actions, along with those of his team, saved the lives of numerous others and led to a decisive victory and the death of 22 enemy combatants.

“We did not really feel threatened during the initial part of the patrol but we had the feeling that we were being watched prior to the actual ambush,” said Plasterer.

Upon the initiation of the enemy ambush, Plasterer found himself in the middle of the kill zone, receiving effective enemy fire from two locations. He immediately returned lethal fire to the north and south of the convoy in an effort to provide suppressive fire for the vehicles caught in the kill zone.

“We were about one day into our mission when we were attacked,” Plasterer said. “We were in a convoy of approximately 20 vehicles, and I was about four vehicles from the back of the convoy.”

Plasterer immediately took control of a nearby interpreter and a five man squad, allowing the element to move to a more defendable location from which to fight. Plasterer identified two enemy combatants and quickly eliminated them.

“These types of missions are what we train to do,” he said. “It’s something, when it actually happens, you don’t even think about the danger. Nobody does, you just do your job.”

Soon after this, a team member identified that a fellow member had received a serious gunshot wound to the neck. Plasterer identified that it was imperative to get to a radio and request emergency close air support as well as MEDEVAC for the wounded individuals. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Plasterer moved out from his covered position under a barrage of AK-47 and RPG fire, moving through an open area to reach a vehicle which had a radio to report the situation. When he realized the radio in this vehicle was inoperable, he moved to his vehicle, which was in the middle of the kill zone, to contact higher headquarters. As he moved back through the open area and into the kill zone to reach his vehicle, the enemy was still laying down a high volume of fire.

“Sergeant First Class Plasterer did what every good Ranger NCO does, he took charge of the situation and got it under control,” said Lt. Gen. Robert Wagner, commanding general of the U.S. Army Special Operations Command.

As Plasterer was calling in for close air support and a MEDEVAC, his vehicle came under heavy small arms fire. Knowing he was pinned down and needed to link back up with his team, he used the vehicle and drove it in reverse back to the squad. As the vehicle was moving backwards, the volume of enemy fire increased and the truck became disabled. He exited the vehicle and again braved the intense small arms fire to link up with the squad. Once back with his squad, Plasterer reassumed command.

“Sergeant First Class Plasterer’s team turned what the enemy hoped to be a decisive victory over the Rangers into a decisive defeat of the enemy,” Wagner said.

Plasterer’s assessment of the situation allowed him to pass critical information to the ground force commander who was able to maneuver forces into a position to fix and kill a seven-man enemy flanking element. Additionally, Plasterer’s decision-making put his own element into a position which allowed them to engage the enemy with deadly precision and maintain superiority. This enabled the remainder of the force to enter the larger building and kill the last of the enemy combatants.

“Many of you don’t realize how important your work is; you put your lives on the line everyday to serve our nation and the impact you have on the war is tremendous,” Wagner said, addressing the Rangers. “You have been engaged in this conflict since the beginning, and your skills and ability continue to amaze and impress me.”

The attention that receiving the Silver Star has generated makes Plasterer quick to point out that he did what anyone else would have done that day.

“Nobody does it for the attention that you get out of it, you do it for job satisfaction,” Plasterer said. “You have the knowledge of what you are doing is important as well as the friendships that you make that will last a lifetime.”
Plasterer was awarded the Silver Star at a valorous awards ceremony Oct. 17 at Fort Benning, Ga.

Plasterer.jpg

Sgt. 1st Class Ray Plasterer, a reconnaissance assistant team sergeant with Regimental Special Troops Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, was awarded the Silver Star for heroic actions in Afghanistan. Plasterer's team was conducting a presence patrol when it came under enemy ambush. (Photo by Tracey A. Bailey, 75th Ranger Regiment PAO)
 

RLTWB375

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Nov 13, 2008
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HOLY CRAP! haha he was my roomate when I was brand new. He was a tabbed specialist then (2001). Now SFC?? Crazy
 
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