Russian Mole's "Apocalyptic" Penetration of Canada Gov

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ProPatria

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Thought some people might want to see this.

An intelligence officer with the Canadian military has been arrested for allegedly sharing classified information with Russia, CTV News has learned.

Jeffrey Paul Delisle, 40, was in courtroom in Halifax on Monday facing two charges that fall under the Security of Information Act.

It's alleged that Delisle had been illegally passing on secret information to a foreign entity since July of 2007.
Sources told CTV's Ottawa Bureau Chief Robert Fife that the foreign entity in question is Russia, and that Delisle was allegedly caught in the act last week.

The arrest and the allegations lend some credence to recent reports that Canada is increasingly becoming a target of espionage.

"Sources say that Russian espionage in this country is as extensive and aggressive as it was during the Cold War," Fife reported.

While the exact nature of the documents in question remains a closely-guarded secret among security officials, sources said that the information could deal with ship movements and data about Canada's allies, Fife said.
None of the allegations against Delisle have been proven in court.

He was an intelligence officer and a navy sub-lieutenant, the Defence Department said. He had been working out of CFB Stadacona's Trinity section, which is a naval communications and intelligence operational centre in Halifax. It's believed that the base is a multi-national one, meaning officers have access to secret data from other NATO countries.
The military is conducting a probe to find out the extent of the leaks.

"Notwithstanding the seriousness of these charges, the RCMP is not aware of any threat to public safety at this time from this situation," RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson told The Canadian Press.

"This investigation demonstrates that Canada is not immune to threats posed by foreign entities wishing to undermine Canadian sovereignty.

"We must be ever vigilant to the real threat of foreign espionage, and continue investing time and resources into the prevention, detection, investigation and prosecution of such acts."

Sources told CTV News that due to the sensitivity of the case, legal proceedings could be subject to a sweeping publication ban. It's also believed that a plea deal could be offered, meaning that none of the particulars of the case would be replayed in open court.

A breach of trust charge has also been filed, and that the alleged offences occurred in or near Halifax, Ottawa and Kingston, Ont.

According to the Security of Information Act, anyone convicted of the Act's most serious offences can be subject to life in prison.

Delisle came to the navy as reservist in 1996 and became a member in 2001. He was promoted to the rank of office in 2008.

Delisle will remains in police custody and will appear in court on Tuesday.
CSIS Director Richard Fadden noted in lengthy 2010 memo that Canada should be concerned about foreign interference.

"Canada is a target for foreign interference due to our natural resources, scientific and technological sectors, our role and influence in the international community, and our close relations with powerful allies," said the memo, which was written to the Public Safety ministry.


Heres the original news story: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20...urity-leak-information-foreign-entity-120116/
 

Marauder06

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Give information to a foreign government, get paid crap and end up getting thrown under the jail if you get caught. Write a tell-all book betraying the same information, get famous and become a millionaire. :thumbsdown:

I hope the Canadians do a better job of prosecuting these types of folks than we do.
 

Crusader74

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Read this in this evenings paper, although it didn't mention which Country was privy to the info...

Hope whatever means he recieved will cover his 40 yr jail term...:rolleyes:
 

RackMaster

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The bail hearing was delayed and the gov't isn't releasing the foreign entity(ies) that he shared the info with but apparently it's been going on for years. With his rank and what they said was his postings, it sounds like he started sharing early on in his career, it wouldn't surprise me if he was approached while at RMC.
 

RackMaster

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And the "repercussions" start but I don't see the Canadian or Russian Gov't making official comments on this any time soon.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/01/20/pol-russians-depart.html

Two Russian Embassy staff in Ottawa have left Canada in the wake of spying allegations against a Canadian naval officer in Halifax, but there's little else that's clear about the murky espionage case.
Intelligence experts and those in close contact with the embassy disagree on whether any Russian diplomats engage in spying, leaving Canadians to try to piece together what bits are public.
Initial media reports said up to four Russian Embassy staff had been removed from a list of embassy and diplomatic staff recognized by Canada. CBC News has confirmed that two have had their credentials revoked since news broke of the naval officer's arrest, while two diplomats left the country a month or more before the arrest this week of Canadian Sub.-Lt. Jeffrey Paul Delisle.
Another report pointed to two other staff who are no longer accredited to be in Canada. It's not clear which of the staff have been expelled over the spying allegations.
 

JBS

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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...csis-rcmp-privy-council-files/article4627659/

These documents reveal the Canadian Forces intelligence officer’s astonishing breadth of access to state secrets, and precisely what the Russian GRU spy service was asking him to look for.

He spied for more than 50 months before being caught. A naval “threat assessment analyst,” he had been cleared to acquire reports from civilian agencies – including CSIS, Canada’s spy agency, and the PCO, Ottawa’s bureaucratic nerve centre.

“We spy on everybody. Everybody spies,” Sub-Lieutenant Delisle told police after his arrest. “I tried to just give them [the Russians] stuff that shows them that ‘Hey, we’re just paying attention.’ ”

The bulk of what he divulged, he said, was picked up by electronic eavesdropping, and not by any undercover spies. “There’s not human assets listed on our machines,” he explained. “It’s SIGINT [signals intelligence] really.”
 

Marauder06

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The bulk of what he divulged, he said, was picked up by electronic eavesdropping, and not by any undercover spies. “There’s not human assets listed on our machines,” he explained. “It’s SIGINT [signals intelligence] really.”


Oh! It's just SIGINT,* that's OK then. :thumbsdown:






*arguably the most-used-for-targeting -INT out there
 

RackMaster

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He should have gotten a firing squad but I'll take 20 years. I think it's amusing that he was fined the same amount he got from the Russians.





Navy spy Jeffrey Delisle sentenced to 20 years in prison


Ryan Vn Horne, Special to QMI Agency
First posted:Friday, February 08, 2013 08:17 AM EST| Updated:Friday, February 08, 2013 02:24 PM EST

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HALIFAX — A Nova Scotia judge said Jeffrey Paul Delisle "coldly and rationally" betrayed his country and sentenced him to 20 years in prison for selling secrets to the Russians.
"That's a big chunk out of the rest of your life," Judge Patrick Curran told Delisle. "That may be a sad thing in the eyes of some, but it's a necessary thing through the eyes of the public of Canada."
Curran picked the sentencing recommendation of Crown attorney Lyne Decarie, but gave Delisle credit for time served in custody since his arrest last January.
That means the 42-year-old faces another 18 years and five months in prison and will be eligible for parole after six years.
Asked if she thought the people of Canada will be happy with the sentence, Decarie said: "I hope so."
Delisle is the first person in Canada to face charges under the Security of Information Act and Decarie thinks the decision provides a strong deterrent.
Mike Taylor, Delisle's defence lawyer, had argued for a nine- or 10-year sentence. He had a long meeting with his client before emerging to speak with reporters.
"He's still a little bit in shock," Taylor said. "It's a significant sentence that he received and one that, quite frankly, I don't think he was really expecting."
The maximum penalty for the charge is life in prison.
Delisle pleaded guilty last October to selling secrets to the Russians between July 6, 2007, and Jan. 10, 2012. The guilty plea spared the military some embarrassment and the possibility of more security breaches during a trial — something the judge took into account.
Taylor said it's too early to decide whether to appeal.
During the sentencing hearing, Taylor tried to show there's no proof Delisle's espionage caused real damage.
Curran, though, said that doesn't matter.
"A person who discloses state secrets commits a grave offence whether or not actual harm has resulted or can be determined," the judge said.
Curran also ordered Delisle to pay a $111,817 fine — equal to what the Russians paid him. He gave Delisle 20 years to pay and if he doesn't, he'll have to spend another two years behind bars.
Gen. Tom Lawson, chief of the defence staff, called Delisle's behaviour "odious" and vowed to speed up the administrative review that will strip the former naval intelligence officer of his rank and salary.
 

rockclimber

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110k for 5 years of high-level spying? That seems like an awfully low amount considering the risks he was incurring. That's 22 000 a year to sell out your homeland? Wow.

I don't mean to imply that any sum could ever justify betraying your country; as a layman, though, I would have assumed that the amounts of money typically involved in these types of cases are in the millions of dollars.
 

Marauder06

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They're really not, though. Enemies of Western nations seem to be, for the most part, pretty cheap bastards.
 
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