Buffalo Bills player collapses on field…game suspended…

Muppet

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"Thank you very much, doctor. Would you like to take medical responsibility for this patient and ride with us to the hospital?"

Crickets.....

Been there, done that. Funny story. Think I mentioned this before. Years back, I95, bad wreck, pin in, medicine in the car, who's there assisting? Dr. Oz. He lives in the area. He was cool, not a cunt, he helped out, our medical director showed up (physician response car), not much for Oz to do.
 

TLDR20

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"Thank you very much, doctor. Would you like to take medical responsibility for this patient and ride with us to the hospital?"

Crickets.....

Crazy thing to me, I wouldn’t even think to check for a pulse for a little while in an otherwise healthy patient. I would have assumed head injury initially for sure.

The body is crazy. Wild to me that most of these deaths happen in Baseball not football. Though a proper hit has way more shoulder impact than chest.
 

policemedic

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Last time I can think of was a college game, not pro (Daily Press - We are currently unavailable in your region). I was one of the medics that responded, our bus was stationed at the event. They resumed the game, like an hour later. Even though it was a referee and not a player, there was a metric shit-ton of controversy and anger over resuming the game.

The actual on-field resuscitation was an absolute clusterfuck, @Muppet would have loved this: docs coming out of the woodwork, everyone wanted to be in charge, yadda yadda yadda. The fact the guy lived is a testament to rapid CPR and defib and not because of the docs in attendance. We had to use police to keep everyone except EMS and team physician (ortho, didn't even have ACLS) back.

I trip over doctors at work. Invariably someone thinks they can help in an emergency and gets in the way. They are usually doctors of paleobotany or xenolinguistics or some such….
 
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TLDR20

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I trip over doctors at work. Invariably someone thinks they can help in an emergency and gets in the way. They are usually doctors of paleobotany or xenoliguistics or some such….

I get called to do floor intubations as a SRNA with some regularity. It is interesting to me that Doctors with no business being involved in an airway code situation think they are more capable than me to intubate. Like bro I put in 20 tubes at least a week. Just cause I’m a student doesn’t mean I haven’t intubated 500 people in the last 2 years.

Luckily normally the anesthesiologist I am with big dicks them out of the way.
 

ThunderHorse

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This was a big discussion at work today with our medical director who always seems to have bad internet when we have a staff call (I'd find a new director just for that). But the BOSS, placed special emphasis on auditing our current medical procedures and making sure every single assigned medical person has their CPR certification and wanting locations for AEDs specified. This will change sports, not because it isn't somewhat common. But because of the stage it was on.

But working in professional sports I can count on zero fingers for types of physicians that don't have relevant specialties. Most doctors on the sideline are Orthopedics or ER physicians. And we're not the NFL. NFL games have team medical teams and independent medical team, all of these people have appropriate specialties. Same with their ATs and any number of additional medical personnel. An NFL team's medical budget is rather ridiculous in size and probably unfit for purpose, but that's what happens when you have CBAs and such to define standards. Point being, in pro sports even with all the nonsense on social this season, there are many many capable people focused on responding to emergencies should they happen.
 
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Muppet

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I get called to do floor intubations as a SRNA with some regularity. It is interesting to me that Doctors with no business being involved in an airway code situation think they are more capable than me to intubate. Like bro I put in 20 tubes at least a week. Just cause I’m a student doesn’t mean I haven’t intubated 500 people in the last 2 years.

Luckily normally the anesthesiologist I am with big dicks them out of the way.

Are you routinely using manual or video for your tubes?
 

Devildoc

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I get called to do floor intubations as a SRNA with some regularity. It is interesting to me that Doctors with no business being involved in an airway code situation think they are more capable than me to intubate. Like bro I put in 20 tubes at least a week. Just cause I’m a student doesn’t mean I haven’t intubated 500 people in the last 2 years.

Luckily normally the anesthesiologist I am with big dicks them out of the way.

At Duke the RTs are the code team airway SMEs. They don't let docs near the airway. In the ED and units, it depends. In the ED sometimes it's a resident, RT, or attending EM doc; on the unit, sometimes a critical care NP/PA, or gas passer on critical care rotation.

@policemedic , when I was a medic the most off-the-wall "doctors" I had try to forcibly assist (i.e., be the boss) was a pharmacist. I did have a pathologist stop once to ask if they could help, but he was actually pretty cool about it. But the number of codes I had in public venues where other docs tried to interfere, oh, my God...
 

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The kid’s on a ventilator, can’t breathe on his own, and they’ve got him on his stomach to get blood or fluid out of his lungs. It doesn’t look good. Hopefully he’ll pull through.
 

Devildoc

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The kid’s on a ventilator, can’t breathe on his own, and they’ve got him on his stomach to get blood or fluid out of his lungs. It doesn’t look good.

Proning isn't super new, but is an increasingly used technique with ventilation. I see where they were able to drop his O2 requirement from 100% to 50%, which is big.

The bigger--biggest--issue will be his neurological status: will how long he was pulseless affect his neurological outcome? That is the driving force in all resuscitation science.
 

TLDR20

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Proning isn't super new, but is an increasingly used technique with ventilation. I see where they were able to drop his O2 requirement from 100% to 50%, which is big.

The bigger--biggest--issue will be his neurological status: will how long he was pulseless affect his neurological outcome? That is the driving force in all resuscitation science.

My friend wanted to do a study on the best place vs the worst place to have a witnessed cardiac arrest: his hypothesis(which bares out in my experience) is either Home Depot or Lowe’s is the best. AED’s and the likelihood of a forst responder being nearby. I forgot what his worst is, but I think it’d be wal mart.

Of the probably 10 to 15 witnessed sudden cardiac death/vfib arrest patients I have taken care of in the ICU 2 made a full recovery. Both had CPR initiated almost immediately and were cooled effectively. Of the others, most died within a few months of progressive organ failure.

One of the worst cases I ever had to deal with was a LEO who had a sudden aortic aneurysm rupture. He only survived due to the Maryland State Police life flight, and “survive” is a loose term.
 

AWP

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To go on a different path for the sake of that discussion: has the NFL made a public statement or any comment refuting the assertion that it (Roger Goddell) told the teams they have 5 minutes to warm up or that they should play the game regardless?
 

Devildoc

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My friend wanted to do a study on the best place vs the worst place to have a witnessed cardiac arrest: his hypothesis(which bares out in my experience) is either Home Depot or Lowe’s is the best. AED’s and the likelihood of a forst responder being nearby. I forgot what his worst is, but I think it’d be wal mart.

Of the probably 10 to 15 witnessed sudden cardiac death/vfib arrest patients I have taken care of in the ICU 2 made a full recovery. Both had CPR initiated almost immediately and were cooled effectively. Of the others, most died within a few months of progressive organ failure.

One of the worst cases I ever had to deal with was a LEO who had a sudden aortic aneurysm rupture. He only survived due to the Maryland State Police life flight, and “survive” is a loose term.

I would love to do a study like that. I think sports venues and churches, but I'd buy Home Depot/Lowes.

In 32 years ( O_o I don't feel that old) I have participated in maybe 40ish witnessed arrests, maybe a few more, five had full recovery, but all five responded immediately to defib. Almost everyone who was coding prior to arrival was dead when we got there, and deader when we got to the ED. Unfortunately, back in the day we measured "success" differently: escalating and high dose epi to get the heart to start. We now know if you give a rock enough epi it'll get a heartbeat (but no neuro activity, and usually rearrests later). There were a few exceptions (pediatric, hypothermic, drowning), but those I can count on one hand combined.
 

amlove21

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To go on a different path for the sake of that discussion: has the NFL made a public statement or any comment refuting the assertion that it (Roger Goddell) told the teams they have 5 minutes to warm up or that they should play the game regardless?
That got memory holed almost immediately. They let Skip Bayless's tweet take the forefront and moved on.
 

Devildoc

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To go on a different path for the sake of that discussion: has the NFL made a public statement or any comment refuting the assertion that it (Roger Goddell) told the teams they have 5 minutes to warm up or that they should play the game regardless?

I believe the on-site guy said that the comment was nonsense, he was in touch with Goodell and the refs, and no one said to warm up and play.

NFL official says league didn’t try to resume MNF game
 
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