Coasties Begin BUD/S

RackMaster

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That is interesting and if they pass would be an excellent asset to the USCG. Is the USCG not considered an active service? If so, why have they not been allowed entry until now? Do they do the same level of training as any other service or is it different?
 
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Boondocksaint375

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The USCG is active service, but an entirely different branch. I think it would have been like sending an Army guy to BUD/S. I'm not entirely sure about the logic behind it, since if they pass BUD/s and the rest of the selection process, they go to a team for several years. I'm not sure if after that point, they would go back to their day jobs on the Cutter? I guess it would make more sense to send them to a tactical unit in the USCG afterwards, but who knows what the overall intention may be.

ALCOAST 367/08
COMDTNOTE 1000
SUBJ: ASSIGNMENT OF COAST GUARD PERSONNEL TO TRAIN AND SERVE WITH U.S. NAVY NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE (SEALS)
1. I AM PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE I RECENTLY SIGNED A MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) WITH THE U.S. NAVY AND THE U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND THAT WILL ALLOW COAST GUARD PERSONNEL TO TRAIN AND SERVE IN THE U.S. NAVY NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE COMMUNITY, SPECIFICALLY AS U.S. NAVY SEALS. THIS MOU IS THE CULMINATION OF A PROCESS STARTED IN JULY 2007 AND WILL ALLOW SELECTED COAST GUARD PERSONNEL TO BE ASSIGNED TO TRAINING AND DUTY AS A NAVY SEAL TO SUPPLEMENT U.S. NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE FORCES. IN ADDITION TO PROVIDING CAPABILITY TO THE NAVY AND SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND, THIS PROGRAM WILL PROVIDE COAST GUARD PERSONNEL THE OPPORTUNITY TO GAIN EXPERIENCE IN THE PLANNING, TRAINING AND EXECUTION OF SPECIAL OPERATIONS.
2. BACKGROUND. THE COAST GUARD HAS A PROUD AND DISTINGUISHED HISTORY AS AN ARMED SERVICE. THE OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE IN THE NAVY SEAL PROGRAM MARKS ANOTHER CHAPTER IN THE COAST GUARDS HISTORY OF SUPPORTING OUR SISTER SERVICES IN MEETING THE CHALLENGES FACING OUR NATION AND PROVIDES ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY TO OPERATIONALIZE THE NATIONS MARITIME STRATEGY. SINCE 9/11, OUR SAFETY AND SECURITY MISSIONS HAVE GROWN CONSIDERABLY, AND WE MUST CONTINUE TO LEARN AND INCREASE OUR SPECIALTY KNOWLEDGE BY PROVIDING OUR PERSONNEL WITH THE REQUISITE SKILLS. THIS NEW PROGRAM PROVIDES AN OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITY FOR OUR SERVICE MEMBERS TO GAIN VALUABLE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE TO SUPPORT DOD AND INCREASE THE COAST GUARDS CAPABILITIES IN OUR PORTS, WATERWAYS AND COASTAL SECURITY (PWCS) MISSION, SPECIFICALLY COUNTER-TERRORISM AND ANTI-TERRORISM OPERATIONS.
3. PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AND ELIGIBILITY STANDARDS. THE DEPLOYABLE OPERATIONS GROUP (DOG), IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE COAST GUARD PERSONNEL COMMAND AND NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE COMMAND WILL ADMINISTER THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THIS PROGRAM. THIS PROGRAM IS OPEN TO ALL MALE PERSONNEL BELOW THE AGE OF 29 WHO MEET THE RIGOROUS ELIGIBILITY STANDARDS REQUIRED TO ENTER SEAL TRAINING. A SOLICITATION MESSAGE DETAILING SPECIFIC PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS AND THE APPLICATION/SCREENING PROCESS IS FORTHCOMING.
4. SEAL TRAINING AND OPERATIONAL TOUR. THE SEAL TRAINING PROGRAM INCLUDES BASIC UNDERWATER DEMOLITIONS/SEAL AND SEAL QUALIFICATION TRAINING THAT WILL LAST 18 MONTHS TO TWO YEARS. UPON TRAINING COMPLETION, SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES WILL BE DESIGNATED AS A SEAL AND ASSIGNED TO A SEAL TEAM. PERSONNEL WHO SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE SEAL TRAINING CAN EXPECT TO BE ASSIGNED TO NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE FOR A TOTAL OF FIVE TO SEVEN YEARS, WHICH COULD INCLUDE THREE TO FIVE OPERATIONAL DEPLOYMENTS.
5. THIS IS AN EXTRAORDINARY OPPORTUNITY FOR THE COAST GUARD AND ITS PERSONNEL. I ENCOURAGE ALL ELIGIBLE PERSONNEL TO CONSIDER THIS PROGRAM.
6. ADMIRAL THAD ALLEN, COMMANDANT, SENDS.
7. INTERNET RELEASE AUTHORIZED.
 

RackMaster

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Thanks Boon.

Perhaps they are trying to enhance the tactical units in the USCG, maybe create their own team environment. Give these guys the training and experience with the real teams, then draw them back as cadre for their own.

Either that or they are just trying to find extra bodies to fill slots... but I'm sure there are plenty of guys in the Navy waiting for a chance to get in there.
 
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Boondocksaint375

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I think that would be a good thing. If they sent them to a non-tactical position on a ship, then I think it would be a waste of time. But who knows.
 

JBS

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Wow. Even though it is the opportunity of a lifetime for the Coast Guard Officers, I bet the SEAL's hate this.

I think its a bad idea.

If the Coast Guard wants to gain first hand knowledge from elite units, they should have SEALs get TAD'd to whatever Coast Guard unit needs those skills, and do the training on site. Either that, or they should re-think the mission they're trying to give to the Coast Guard, and get some SEAL's, Rangers or other SOF unit to do the mission.

Why does a Coast Guard unit need Amphibious reconaissance/small unit combatives capabilities?

But, hey, what do I know?
 
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Boondocksaint375

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I don't think it is a bad thing per say, after all, they are actually going through the selection process/training vice just being attached to a team. However, I still wonder "why?"
 

JBS

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I don't think it is a bad thing per say, after all, they are actually going through the selection process/training vice just being attached to a team. However, I still wonder "why?"

Do they rate a Trident if they complete BUDs?
 

104TN

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From what I understand most of the guys come from the TACLET community so some of the skills would definitely be of benefit to them.
 
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Boondocksaint375

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No, they have to complete the entire process, which they will do as well. After BUD/S and all the other happy training afterwards they are on probation, and after that they are awarded the Trident.
 

formerBrat

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FWIW

Found this on the net, when I was looking this up... and old article from late last year about this...however, I highlighted something of interest possibly. Of course this information could have changed by now.( the highlighted part that is )

https://navyseals.com/12-coasties-being-considered-seal-training

12 Coasties being considered for SEAL training
Posted October 31st, 2008 in NavySEALs.com Intel
Source: Amy McCullough, Army Times
Of the 12 remaining candidates Coast Guard and Navy officials hope to select as many qualified candidates as possible to go through Navy SEAL training by the end of next week, said a Deployable Operations Group spokesman. The move would be a first for the Coast Guard.

Representatives from DOG and Naval Special Warfare Command will screen the remaining 12 applicants Nov. 2-7 at the Naval Diving Salvage Training Center in Panama City, Fla., said Lt. James McLay, spokesman for DOG commander Rear Adm. Thomas Atkin.

After Commandant Adm. Thad Allen announced the program July 31, Coast Guard Personnel Command fielded more than 150 phone calls from people requesting additional information. As of the Sept. 15 deadline, 19 people had applied — 12 officers and seven enlisted members whose ratings included two boatswain’s mates, four machinery technicians and one food service specialist, McLay said.

Of the 19 applicants, 12 were selected to move onto the evaluation phase in Florida. Those still in the running include eight officers — three ensigns and five lieutenant junior grades — and four enlisted members – three machinery technicians and one boatswain’s mate. Originally the goal was to have at least two officers and two enlisted Coast Guardsmen participate in the program, although McLay said there are no caps to those selected.

“The goal is to supply the Navy with as many qualified applicants as available,” McLay said.

The Coast Guardsmen who make it through the nearly two years of physically and mentally challenging training will be assigned to a SEAL team for five to seven years, although they still officially will be part of the Coast Guard.

Those who successfully complete the service commitment are not required to return to the Coast Guard, but Allen said this summer that he wants them to come back.

“It would bring a tremendous amount of expertise and knowledge [to the Coast Guard], and that would really improve our program,” Allen said. “It really was a win-win for us and the Navy special ops, because they will now have a broader group to draw on.”

At this point, Coast Guardsmen are not eligible to become special warfare combatant-craft crewmen — the sailors who operate SEAL transport boats. However, Atkin has said, “we are working on it.”

“Our engagement with the SEALs is huge, but the Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps partnership, as outlined in the maritime strategy, is really the direction we are going here,” he said shortly after the announcement.


I found this interesting, as from what I've read, it's being pushed partly (including NSW) by USCG's DOG (deployable operations group) which was created I guess to have all their MAST/TACLET's under one umbrella? If this is the case it would seem that it would augment their boarding and tactical skills...but when you read the highlighed part stating that they wouldn't have to return to the CG after their 5-7 year stent....what good does that do for the CG and DOG?
 

Scotth

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This policy seems to benefit the Navy much more the CG by giving them a bigger recruiting pool. I'm glad to see them go through the training and then deploy with a team because it would have been a waste of training otherwise to just do BUD/S and then go back to the CG. Sure the selection and training process is great but there would be a lot more effective and efficient ways to train up CG personal in boat clearing methods then having a handful of people going through BUD/S. Not to mention taking a training slot from a potential Seal Team recruit.
 

hooyah

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the coast guard is under the control of the navy when the us is in a time of war but otherwise it is under homeland security
 

JimMCpog

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Found this on the net, when I was looking this up... and old article from late last year about this...however, I highlighted something of interest possibly. Of course this information could have changed by now.( the highlighted part that is )

https://navyseals.com/12-coasties-being-considered-seal-training




I found this interesting, as from what I've read, it's being pushed partly (including NSW) by USCG's DOG (deployable operations group) which was created I guess to have all their MAST/TACLET's under one umbrella? If this is the case it would seem that it would augment their boarding and tactical skills...but when you read the highlighed part stating that they wouldn't have to return to the CG after their 5-7 year stent....what good does that do for the CG and DOG?


That might have been what they were briefed on, that they wanted men who understood they would provide the "seed corn" for an improved DOG down the road. 5-7 years will be beyond the contract of a Coast Guard Officer (only the 4 Officers passed the USCG selection) so he would be unable to retain them anyway. But they could change their minds after 5-7 years with a SEAL team. They might never come back. It seems that there would be better ways to do an exchange program.
 

formerBrat

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Update on this from Military.com

http://www.military.com/news/article/three-coastguardsmen-left-in-seal-quest.html

Three Coastguardsmen Left in SEAL Quest
August 06, 2009
Military.com|by Christian Lowe


First there were 19 who were whittled down to 12. Then only five were left standing.

Now, after one of the world's most crushing selection programs, only two remain - well, three, if you count the one who was rolled back into the initial phase of the school.

For the first time in its storied history, the Coast Guard is on track to have two of its own earn the coveted trident badge of a Navy SEAL. The two officers have reached the third phase of initial SEAL selection after joining Basic Underwater Demolition School class 276 in March, enduring the grueling mental and physical travails that weed out all but the hardiest warriors.

"I'm very proud of these guys," said Master Chief Petty Officer Darrick DeWitt, the senior enlisted advisor for the Coast Guard's Deployable Operations Group, which ran the selection process for the service.

"We wanted to make sure we sent people with good character and good values. I think we did that," he added in a telephone interview with Military.com. "These guys not only represented the Coast Guard well, but represented their country well."

After a two-year effort to leverage the expertise of Naval Special Warfare and the Coast Guard's new role in homeland security and maritime special operations, the service selected its first group of Coastguardsmen to become commandos late last summer.

Coast Guard officials say they hope the SEAL-trained Coasties will seed the rest of the force with valuable skills learned in special operations training and operations and bring back to their sea service a bit of the esprit de corps found in the commando ranks..............
 
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Boondocksaint375

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Coast Guardsmen are 1st to ever graduate BUD/S


Two Coast Guardsmen became the first in their service to graduate from the Navy’s Basic Underwater Demolition/SEALs training Thursday.

The graduates, whose names have not been released, have been training since January. They still must go through another six months of training before they officially become SEALs, said Lt. Fred Martin, a spokesman for the Naval Special Warfare Center at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, Calif. Up next: parachute training, the Junior Officer Training Course and the final SEAL qualification training, which includes cold-weather training in Kodiak, Alaska.

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Thad Allen wrote proudly about the graduates in his blog.
“Two Guardians made history today,” he said. “While they still have an intensive training program to complete before pinning on their Tridents in the spring, this is an impressive accomplishment, and we should all be very proud of our shipmates and their performance representing the U.S. Coast Guard amongst the elite Navy SEALs.”

One of the Coast Guardsman graduated as the class officer in charge —the senior ranking member of the class, Martin said.

“They still have a ways to go, but they have handled themselves very well,” Martin said.
The Coast Guard originally sent four service members to training, but one dropped out and another was injured before the dreaded Hell Week began. He has since recovered and will start training with a new class next week, Martin said.

The Coast Guard received 16 applications this year from service members who want to join a SEAL class, Allen wrote. The applications will be reviewed, and if the candidates meet the Navy admission guidelines, they will be sent for training next year.


http://www.navytimes.com/news/2009/09/coastguard_buds_090309w/
 

KBar666

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Forgive me for my ingnorance,but being that I'm way on the outside looking in I have to ask.

Whats the reason for either service doing this?

I guess what I'm asking is what exactly do they plan to get out of coast guard people being trained for special operations.
 
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